Dr Akilah El – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah El

10 Herbal Teas You Should Keep in Your Kitchen Cabinet

Kitchen_CabinetBy Daisy Luther

When you’re sick, little is more comforting than holding a steaming mug of fragrant tea in both hands, warming your face with the hot steam. Somehow, no matter how rotten you felt before, you instantly feel just a tiny bit better.

Whether you are lucky enough to grow your own tea herbs, you purchase loose teas, or you use tea bags, your cabinet is not complete without the following ingredients. These teas are delicious and beneficial, with many different healing qualities. Just like band-aids, antibiotic cream, or aspirin, these items are vital additions to your pantry, allowing you to dispense a hot, steaming, fragrant cup of nurturing in as little time as it takes you to boil water.

There are many different herbs from around the world that have wonderful healing properties. I’ve concentrated this list on ones that can be easily acquired and stored, or which can be easily grown in a backyard garden or a sunny window.

1. Mint

Mint tea is the classic herbal tea. Mint is an ingredient in many different commercial tea blends and is much-loved for its refreshing fragrance.

Growing it:

Mint is an herb that doesn’t just grow easily – it can quickly overtake your garden! For this reason, it is recommended to grow mint in either a container or its own bed. There are many varieties of mint and the healing properties are similar. Whether you grow peppermint or spearmint, the active component is menthol.

Caution:

If you suffer from acid reflux, mint tea may worsen your symptoms. Mint has antispasmodic properties.

Mint tea can be used to:

Reduce congestion in a cold or flu sufferer.
Reduce pain and bloating from gas.
Reduce cramping from diarrhea.
Act as a mild expectorant for a chest cold or bronchitis.
Induce sweating, the body’s natural cooling mechanism. This is a natural way to reduce a fever.
Relieve nausea without vomiting.

2. Ginger

This homely root is an ingredient in many natural cough, cold, and nausea treatments. Instead of giving your child gingerale when they are suffering from an upset stomach (and all of the HFCS and artificial flavors that come in it) brew up a nice cup of ginger tea sweetened with honey for a real dose of soothing ginger!

Growing it:

Ginger is a tropical plant that is not difficult to grow indoors. It requires excellent soil, warmth, humidity, and filtered sunlight.

Caution:

It’s not recommended to exceed 4 grams of ginger per day – components in the herb can cause irritation of the mouth, heartburn and diarrhea if taken in excess.

Ginger tea can be used to:

Reduce nausea.
Prevent or treat motion sickness.
Warm the body of someone suffering from chills.
Induce sweating to break a fever.
Soothe a sore throat.

3. Chamomile

Chamomile tea should be steeped a little longer than other herbal teas in order to get all of the medicinal benefits. This soothing, slightly apple-flavored tea has mild sedative properties. The petals of the tiny flowers are where the medicinal values lie.

Growing it:

Chamomile is easy to grow from seeds. Start them in the late winter and transfer outdoors when the risk of frost has passed. Once the plants are well established, chamomile can thrive with little water during hot weather. When buying your seeds, note that German chamomile is an annual and Roman chamomile is a perennial.

Caution:

Chamomile tea should be avoided by people who take blood thinners. As well, those who suffer from ragweed allergies may also have an allergic reaction to chamomile, as the two plants are related.

Chamomile tea can be used to:

Relieve anxiety
Induce sleep
Soothe mild nausea and indigestion
Relieve a cough from throat irritation

4. Cinnamon

AspoonCinnamonCinnamon doesn’t just smell like a holiday in a cup, it is anti-bacterial, antiviral, and antifungal, making it an excellent all-around remedy for whatever ails you. Cinnamon is a wonderful source of immune-boosting antioxidants.

Growing it:

Cinnamon is the fragrant bark of a tropical evergreen tree which is surprisingly easy to grow indoors in large pots.

Try this delicious winter beverage:

1-1/2 tsp of cinnamon powder or a cinnamon stick
1 tea bag
honey to taste
Almond Milk to taste
Stir cinnamon powder well into boiling water and steep for 8 minutes. Add a tea bag and steep for 2 more minutes. Stir in honey and warm milk.

Cinnamon tea can be used to:

Increase blood flow and improve circulation
Reduce nausea
Ease stomach discomfort, bloating, gas and indigestion
Warm the body of someone suffering from chills
Soothe a sore throat
Reduce cold symptoms

5. Lemongrass

Lemongrass is another herb that is loaded with healing properties. The spiky, easy-to-grow plant has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, and antifungal properties, making it helpful in treating a plethora of ailments.

Growing it:

You can actually root the lemongrass that you buy at the grocery store to start your own patio lemongrass farm. It grows beautifully in a large pot, making it a good herb for the apartment windowsill farmer to cultivate. It can be grown year-round indoors.

Lemongrass tea can help to:

aid in digestion.
calm nervous disorders and anxiety.
aid in the treatment of high blood pressure if a daily cup is enjoyed.
dilate blood vessels and improve circulation.
act as a mild diuretic to reduce fluid retention.

6. Echinacea

This lovely flowering plant is probably the pinnacle of herbal preventatives. Echinacea is not only anti-bacterial, it stimulates the body’s immune system to fight off bacterial and viral attacks. The medicinal properties are in the leaves and the purple flowers.

Growing it:

Echinacea is also known as the “purple coneflower”. The plant has deep taproots and is somewhat drought resistant. It is a perennial. Sow seeds outdoors in the early spring before the last frost. These plants like full sun and they don’t like too much moisture.

Echinacea tea can help to:

enhance the immune system.
relieve pain.
reduce inflammation.
provide antioxidant effects.
shorten illness time for sufferers of the common cold.

Rose_hip_glassJar7. Rosehip

Rosehip makes a tart, tangy pink-colored tea. Rosehip is from the seed-filled pod at the base of a rose blossom, giving you a practical reason to have more rose bushes in your garden. It mixes well and enhances the flavor of any berry or fruit-flavored tea.

Rosehip tea can help to:

provide a nutritional supplement of Vitamin C.
improve adrenal function.
boost the immune system.
provide minerals such as calcium, iron, silicon, selenium, natural sodium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus and zinc.
increase energy.
heal tissues and cells.

8. Blackberry leaf

Dried blackberry leaves give a luscious fruity flavor when steeped in boiling water. Not only are they the basis of many delicious teas, they are loaded with a beneficial component called tannins. (Bonus tip: add a blackberry leaf to a jar of pickles when canning – the tannin helps to keep the pickles crisp.)

Caution:

Excess consumption of blackberry leaves (or anything containing tannins) can cause liver damage.

Blackberry leaf tea can help to:

provide vitamin C.
treat diarrhea.
reduce pain and inflammation from sore throats.
provide an antibacterial effect against H pylori, the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers.
provide immune-boosting antioxidants.
provide high levels of salicylic acid, which gives them similar properties to aspirin, such as pain relief and fever relief.
reduce inflammation of the gums.

9. Clove

Cloves are a wonderful addition to herbal tea just for the taste. Not only is the flavor delicious, but cloves have been used for centuries to treat a variety of ailments. The multipurpose little seed packs a mighty punch with its antiviral, antifungal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Growing it:

Cloves are the dried buds of a flowering evergreen tree that is native to Indonesia, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, and Madagascar. They are generally imported and, unfortunately, are not easy to cultivate in other climates or greenhouse atmospheres.

Caution:

In high amounts cloves can cause liver damage, blood in the urine, diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness.

Clove tea can help to:

provide pain relief – it is a powerful analgesic.
break up mucous and work as an expectorant.
provide a fragrant decongestant in a steaming cup of tea.
treat strep throat or tonsillitis – it relieves pain and provides a wash of antiviral and antibacterial components.

10. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm, also known as Bee Balm, was first recorded to have been used by the ancient Greeks as an overall tonic for good health. It is an ingredient in the old world Carmelite water, a recipe created by Carmelite nuns in the early 1600s to treat headaches. (The traditional mixture also contained coriander, lemon-peel, nutmeg, and angelica root.)

Growing it:

Lemon balm is easy to grow and produces throughout the summer. The more you harvest, the more it produces. It is perennial in warmer climates. Lemon balm like rich moist soil with organic compost and partial shade in the hottest part of the day. It is another one of those herbs that can take over a garden, so plant it in a confined area.

Lemon balm tea can help to:

fight off viruses – it was used historically against shingles, mumps, and cold sores.
calm anxiety and nervousness.
aid in sleep.
aid the digestive system by reducing spasms and quelling heartburn.
reduce nausea.
What do you keep in your herbal medicine cabinet? Why is it an important natural remedy for you? Please share in the comments section below!

A Last Word

Be prepared by keeping the above ingredients close at hand, and be self-sufficient by producing as many as possible for yourself – which is always the best way to make sure that the items were grown using safe, organic methods. Considering that we most often turn to herbal teas for healing purposes, it’s especially important to purchase or grow organic herbs for this purpose. If your leaves are bathed in pesticide and then you add them to boiling water, instead of healing goodness, you are steeping toxins.

When making tea for medicinal purposes, be sure to steep the tea in a teapot with a lid, or to cover your mug while the herbs are steeping. This helps to make a more potent brew by keeping all of the healing oils in the tea, instead of allowing them to drift into the room. Most herbs should be steeped for about 10 minutes for maximum results.

About the author: Daisy Luther is a freelance writer and editor. Her website, The Organic Prepper, offers information on healthy prepping, including premium nutritional choices, general wellness and non-tech solutions. You can follow Daisy on Facebook and Twitter or visit The Organic Prepper.

Quick Tips For America’s Favorite Fruit

By Tammy Williams

Most apples are great for cooking, whether you’re making applesauce, crisps, crumbles, or cake. In general, the apple’s sweetness pairs nicely with classic dishes and can be used as a substitute sweetener.

Here are some tips to get the most out of your apples.

Go for firm
When buying apples, choose ones without bruises or soft, mushy spots. They should be firm for their specific variety (a McIntosh will not be as firm as a Granny Smith).

Wrapped in the dark
To keep apples for an extended period of time, wrap each apple in newspaper (don’t use paper with colored ink), and then store in a dark, cool place like the cellar or the garage. To keep apples in the fridge, place them in a perforated plastic bag and then in the crisper. Do not store bruised or cut apples since that will accelerate the spoilage of the other stored apples.

A touch of lemon
If you’re slicing apples and don’t want the exposed pieces of flesh to turn brown, sprinkle lemon juice over them.

Sweet and tart
When baking a pie, use a mix of sweet and tart apples to obtain a balanced flavor.

Eating Strawberries May Reduce Cholesterol Levels

 

strawberries26685

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like compound that belongs to a class of molecules called steroids. It’s found in many foods, in your bloodstream and in all your body’s cells. If you had a handful of cholesterol, it might feel like a soft, melted candle.

Cholesterol performs three main functions:

It helps make the outer coating of cells.
It makes up the bile acids that work to digest food in the intestine.
It allows the body to make Vitamin D and hormones, like estrogen in women and testosterone in men.

In other words, cholesterol is a type of fat that people normally carry in their blood but it can act as an ally or a deadly enemy.

The liver is the organ responsible for producing the cholesterol we need . However, when you consume foods like eggs, organ meats, red meat, seafood and dairy you build extra amount of unwanted cholesterol in the body. Too much cholesterol can cause cardiovascular disease and stroke. When cholesterol builds up in the arteries it causes them to be narrow and hard. This is known as atherosclerosis.

Licensed dietitians and nutritionist advise us to limit our consumption of foods that will increase cholesterol levels. On the other hand, it is necessary to consume high amounts of foods that will not only help control cholesterol but also reduce it.

One food that has been found to lower cholesterol are strawberries. Strawberries have nutritional compounds that are helpful to lowering  cholesterol .Not only is this fruit fresh and delicious but it gives you the vitamins and minerals that will help improve your health and prevent cardiovascular problems . The researchers at Universidad Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM Italy) along with their colleagues from the Universities of Salamanca,  conducted an analysis that reveals how the consumption of 500 grams of strawberries help reduce cholesterol.

They have found that regular consumption of strawberries helped to achieve a decline in the total amount of cholesterol (8.78 percent), bad cholesterol (13.72 percent) and triglycerides – a kind of fat found in blood (20.8 percent) – without affecting the level of good cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein or HDL).

Apart from lowering cholesterol, the strawberry diet helped to improve general plasma lipid profile, antioxidants and antihemolytic activities and platelet function, according to a statement from the researchers.

However, researchers could not find out the exact compound in the strawberries that helped this occurrence. Based on previous evidence, they said that anthocyanin, the flavonoid pigments which provide color to strawberry may be playing a major role.

The Quick Guide to Herbal Remedies – eBook

by Dr. Akilah El

by Dr. Akilah El

I am very excited to share with you my quick and easy to use herbal remedy guide. My quick guide to herbal remedies book is a comprehensive alternative health resource providing information on a variety of natural remedies, nutritional healing foods, as well as the deficiencies associated with each dis-ease or illness.

Please use this book as a reference guide for future use. Feel free to share this with your family and friends. SPREAD THE WORD!!!

 

 

Click the link below to get your free copy NOW!

 http://www.celestialhealing.net/audiofiles/ebook_page.htm

Exercise (Not Exorcise) Your Demons

02-Esoteric

By Lisa CypersKamenHarvesting Happiness

We all have demons: things that we fear, loathe, avoid at all costs, or feel guilty or angry about. And demons can be lurking anywhere. You’re trying to lose weight but can’t give up French fries. You just can’t bring yourself to let a call go unanswered during your family vacation. You’re afraid that a mistake you’ve made has pushed away someone you love. You have other compulsions that you just can’t control. These types of destructive habits keep us awake at night and breed negative energy from our head to our toes.

Personal demons can take many different forms, but they all have one thing in common: they seem to multiply when we’re lacking a healthy diversion. So, how do you keep your demons from occupying the prime real estate in your mind? There’s always the religious practice of exorcising the demons away (made controversial – and somewhat spooky – by countless Hollywood portrayals over the years). It has been practiced in some religions for centuries, sometimes with reportedly successful results, other times not so much. Exorcisms might work for some, but there’s also a much simpler route to ridding your inner demons: the gym. When you feel your demons taking control, exercise rather than exorcise them away.

You’ve heard the story about someone bursting into tears during an intense yoga workout, and you undoubtedly have a super-fit friend who always goes on a run when something is bothering him. (You usually reach for the chocolate). Even though it pains you to try to emulate your gym-happy friend (and you shouldn’t, in most circumstances!), take his lead in this case. When your inner demons are launching an attack against your psyche, the best thing to do is exercise them out of your body. Press, curl, lunge, lift, rollerblade, stretch or run those nagging thoughts out of your consciousness and into the open. You don’t have to be a bodybuilder; often, fifteen minutes of physical activity is all it takes to send your demons from your mind. And if your troublesome thoughts are purely emotion-based, exercise has an even better chance of helping you conquer them. Study after study has shown that exercise is often the missing link that connects our emotional and physical states and brings a sense of harmony. Demons or not, we could all use a little more harmony in our lives!

Happiness is an inside job

Happiness Strategy:

The next time your demons are taking over, set aside fifteen minutes for physical activity. It can be a series of deep stretches, a quick run around the block, or anything else that you find physically satisfying. While you’re engaging in that activity, do your best to use that negative energy as fuel for the physical activity you’re performing. Make a mental note of how your mind and body feel, and try to implement physical activity the next time your demons are calling.

 

Check out this video by Dr. Akilah El as she explains her personal experience of exercising to exorcise the demons. 

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