Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

10 Quick Tips For Eating Healthy


by Michelle Nelson

Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people think.Take a few minutes to identify the habits you wish to change. Do you pack a wholesome lunch, only to be distracted by fast or junk food places around your work? Do you provide healthy lunches for your kids, but at the end of the day find them smashed in the bottom of their backpack? It is important to be realistic about yourself and your family’s likes and dislikes. It is unlikely that anyone can switch from hamburgers and French fries to tofu and whole grains in one day. Prepare foods that support your health, vitality, and optimum weight.

Here are 10 quick tips that can help you eat healthy on a budget.

1. Plan Your Meals
When it comes to saving money at the grocery store, planning is essential. Use one day each week to plan your meals for the upcoming week. Then, make a grocery list of what you need.

Also, make sure to scan your fridge and cabinets to see what you already have. There are usually a lot of foods hidden in the back that can be used.

Only plan to purchase what you know you’re going to use, so that you don’t end up throwing away a lot of what you buy.

2. Stick To Your Grocery List
Once you’ve planned your meals and made your grocery list, stick to it. It’s very easy to get sidetracked at the grocery store, which can lead to unintended, expensive purchases. As a general rule, try to shop the perimeter of the store first. This will make you more likely to fill your cart with whole foods.

The middle of the store often contains the most processed and unhealthy foods. If you find yourself in these aisles, look to the top or bottom of the shelves rather than straight ahead. The most expensive items are usually placed at eye level.

Additionally, there are now many great grocery list apps to help you shop. Some of them can even save favorite items or share lists between multiple shoppers. Using an app is also a great way to make sure you don’t forget your list at home.

3. Cook at Home
Cooking at home is much cheaper than eating out. Make it a habit to cook at home, rather than eating out at the last minute. Generally, you can feed an entire family of 4 for the same price as buying food for one or two people at a restaurant.

Some people find it best to cook for the entire week on the weekends, while others cook one meal at a time. By cooking yourself, you also gain the benefit of knowing exactly what is in your food.

4. Cook Large Portions and Use Your Leftovers
Cooking large meals can save you both time and money. Leftovers can be used for lunches, in other recipes or frozen in single-portion sizes to be enjoyed later on.

Leftovers usually make very good stews, stir-fries, salads and burritos. These types of food are especially great for people on a budget.

5. Don’t Shop When You’re Hungry
If you go to the grocery store hungry, you are more likely to stray from your grocery list and buy something on impulse.

When you’re hungry, you often crave foods that aren’t good for you or your budget. Try to grab a piece of fruit, yogurt or other healthy snack before you go to the store.

6. Buy Whole Foods
Some foods are way cheaper in less processed form. Whole grains, like brown rice and oats, are also cheaper per serving than most processed cereals.

The less processed foods are also often sold in larger quantities, and yield more servings per package. Whole foods are often less expensive than their processed counterparts. You can also buy them in larger quantities.

7. Stock up on Sales
If you have favorite products or staples that you use frequently, you should stock up on them when they’re on sale. If you’re sure that it’s something you’ll definitely use, you may as well stock up and save a little money.

Just make sure that it will last for a while and won’t expire in the meantime. It will not save you any money to buy something you’ll end up throwing out later on.

8. Shop For Produce That Is In Season
Local produce that is in season is generally cheaper. It is also usually at its peak in both nutrients and flavor. Produce that is not in season has often been transported halfway around the world to get to your store, which is not good for either the environment or your budget. Also, buy produce by the bag if you can. That is usually a lot cheaper than buying by the piece.

If you buy more than you need, you can freeze the rest or incorporate it into next week’s meal plans.

9. Buy in Bulk
Buying some foods in bulk quantities can save you a lot of money. Grains, such as brown rice, millet, barley and oats, are all available in bulk. They also keep for a long time, if you store them in airtight containers. This is also true for beans, lentils, some nuts and dried fruit.

These are all staple foods that are relatively inexpensive and can be used in a variety of healthy meals.

10. Pack Your Lunch
Eating out is very expensive, especially if done regularly. Packing your lunch, snacks, drinks and other meals is less expensive and way healthier than eating out.

If you have adapted to cooking large meals at home (see tip #4), you’ll always have a steady lunch to bring with you without any additional effort or cost. It does require some planning, but it should save you a lot of money at the end of the month.


Get great recipes from the health tips above.

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FDA Approved: Paint Thinner In Children’s Cereals



The challenge to be informed about what we are eating grows ever more complex. Many people trust Trader Joe’s as one of the smaller grocery store chains offering higher quality foods without unnecessary additives, and other harmful ingredients that can cause cancer, neurological damage, or developmental delays. But one mom recently found trisodium phosphate, an industrial strength paint thinner in her children’s Trader Joe’s breakfast cereal, and she is wondering what it is doing there. (The ingredient is found in other popular cereals as well).

Trisodium phosphate, otherwise known as trisodium orthophosphate, sodium phosphate, or TSP, is well known by construction workers, DIYers, and developers, but not to most parents shopping for their morning meal. It is an inorganic phosphate which can be detrimental to our health. It is often used in place of mineral spirits to remove paint!

It isn’t just Trader Joe’s that sells cereal containing TSP; it is in hundreds of foods, in dozens of stores, as an ‘additive’ which the FDA has called ‘safe,’ but even the activist environmental group The Clean Water Act has taken steps to limit the use of TSP in cleaning supplies because it damages the environment. Shouldn’t that give pause to the food industry, and make them question why it should be in our food? It shows up in toothpaste, hair color, processed cheeses and meats, canned soups, and even mouthwash. What kind of ‘additive’ is this anyway?

Just some of the minor problems with eating TSP include:

  • The reduction of bone density due to mineral leeching
  • Calcification of the kidneys
  • Serious irritation of gastric mucosa
  • Abdominal burning
  • Shock

PesticideInfo.org says that this substance should be avoided at all cost. Just as Subway removed a harmful additive to their breads recently due to a blogger’s pressure and subsequent petition, signed by thousands, this substance needs to be removed from all food, or ingestible items – especially cereals or baby toothpaste that children consume.

You can let your local grocery stores know that they shouldn’t carry products which contain TSP. You can boycott items yourself that contain it, or you can tell the FDA just what you think of their ‘safe’ classification of this obvious toxin. Consumers have a right to non-toxic foods, and TSP definitely doesn’t belong in a bowl of your kid’s cereal.



About the Author

Christina Sarich is a humanitarian and freelance writer that has broken numerous health-related news stories.

Some of her biggest pieces revolve around exposing the fraud and lies told by Big Food and Biotech. If you want to learn how food companies are tainting the food supply with toxic ingredients or how genetically modified foods are leading to the downfall of our food supply. Christina’s articles are must-reads.

Her blog is Yoga for the New World, and her latest book is Pharma Sutra: Healing the Body and Mind Through the Art of Yoga.


Study Reveals How Food Labels Make Us Buy Certain Products


University of Minnesota researchers say that people are more likely to purchase a healthy food if it is labeled with a symbol suggesting it is healthy, as opposed to having the actual word healthy on it.

Lead researcher Dr. Traci Mann of the University of Minnesota, had this to say:

“The word ‘healthy’ seems to turn people off, particularly when it appears on foods that are obviously healthy. The subtle health message, such as the healthy heart symbol, seemed to be more effective at leading people to choose a healthy option.”

One of Mann’s studies involved 400 adults in a lab setting, where 65% of the participants took an apple instead of candy if there was a heart symbol on it. Only 45% of adults chose an apple if the fruit was labeled with the word healthy.

Food Psychology: How Children Ate 4x More Broccoli

In another study involving 300 adults and carrots, Mann and her colleagues found just 20% of participants chose carrots over chips when the carrots had healthy on them. But when the carrots were labeled with a heart symbol, 30% of the adults chose them over candy.

The researchers also took their experiments to elementary school cafeterias. They found children were 4 times more likely to eat broccoli or red peppers if the vegetables were served first. The students were far less likely to choose the vegetables when they were served alongside other food offerings. The team got the same results when they tried the experiment in a lab setting and offered various snack foods alongside veggies.

The findings were presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s 17th Annual Convention in San Diego.

“What these results show us is that rather than leading dieters to make healthier choices, these food police messages are actually making unhealthy foods even more enticing to dieters,” said researcher Nguyen Pham of Arizona State University.

‘A Real Danger’

According to the team from Arizona State, there is “a real danger in using messages that convey only negative information about food.” One can only assume when researchers refer to “negative information,” they mean many people think healthy food is flavorless and unsatisfying.

Researcher Naomi Mandel said:

“Our work shows that negative messages about unhealthy food will backfire among dieters. If you want to change what they eat, a more even-handed message that contains both positive and negative information is the way to go.”

‘Tricking the brain’ can be a useful tool. I pulverize fresh spinach and put it in my spaghetti sauce to trick my leafy-greens-hating hubby into eating it. He thinks all that green stuff is just herbs and spices. If he saw me do it or I called it spinach pasta sauce, he’d never eat it.

It’s kind of like telling little kids they’re eating baby trees instead of broccoli. (It works with my nieces and nephews.)


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Research reveals that sugar is harder to quit than cocaine

A study conducted by Dr. Nicole Avena of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has found that sugar consumption and addictive behaviors are closely linked. Just how bad could a sugar addiction be, you ask? Sadly, the study suggests that it’s eight times more addictive than cocaine.

If that doesn’t make you want to skip that cola purchase, I don’t know what will.

Couple these findings with the fact that most Americans ingest approximately 22 teaspoons of sugar daily, and it’s clear that the findings are indeed highly disturbing. Even worse is the consumption by teenagers; it’s estimated that this age group consumes about 34 teaspoons of it every day. Soda has been eyed as the most common culprit behind so much sugar ingestion, with other junk food choices like cookies not far behind. Unquestionably, people are flocking to sugar like it’s going out of style, and now we know why – it’s an addiction.

Highly-processed foods alter brain, activating areas linked to addictions

Dr. Avena’s article on the topic was published in the journal PLOS ONE, which states the following:

… addictive substances are altered to increase the rate at which the addictive agent is absorbed into the bloodstream. For example, when a coca leaf is chewed, it is considered to have little addictive potential. However, once it is processed into a concentrated dose with rapid delivery into the system, it becomes cocaine, which is highly addictive. Similarly,highly processed foods, compared to naturally occurring foods, are more likely to induce a blood sugar spike. This is important, because there is a known link between glucose levels and activation of areas of the brain that are involved with addiction.

The published study, entitled, Which Foods May Be Addictive? The Roles of Processing, Fat Content, and Glycemic Load, elaborates as follows:

… the addictive potential of a food is likely to increase if the food is highly processed to increase the amount, or dose, of fat and/or refined carbohydrates and if the refined carbohydrates are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly (high GL). An essential next step in the consideration of “food addiction” is to determine which foods or food attributes pose the greatest risk in the development of addictive-like eating behaviors in humans.

Avoid pizza and these other foods, which are said to be the most addictive

According to Dr. Avena, pizza is the most addictive food. Just one slice contains more sugar than a few Oreo cookies, thanks to the hidden sugar in the tomato sauce. Now, we all know that most people don’t just stop at a mere slice. In fact, we’ve all probably seen folks devour an entire pizza on their own, which is likely akin to polishing off an entire box (or more) of Oreo’s … not good.

Furthermore, what do most people enjoy drinking with their pizza? You guessed it – soda! As mentioned earlier, people are downing such liquid sugar more today than ever before, demonstrating our collective dependency on the unhealthy substance.

After pizza, Dr. Avena explains that cookies, ice cream and chips also rank high among the most addictive foods. They too, have a sugar content that impacts the brain in a way that mimics drug and alcohol addiction.

The least addictive foods, according to the study? Eat more cucumbers, carrots and beans; they’re the least addictive, and therefore, are healthy choices to include in your diet.

These findings reinforce the importance of avoiding a junk food diet, and instead, enjoying one that consists of fresh, organic options. Fruits and vegetables, along with a variety of nuts, seeds and superfoods, are the best choices to keep your health on track and even reverse certain ailments.

Why feed your body a substance that’s eight times as addictive as cocaine, when you can take the better path and live the healthier, longer life you deserve?

8 health-promoting veggies that can easily be regrown over and over again

by: David Gutierrez – Natural News

People who are new to gardening sometimes feel intimidated by the leap of faith required to grow plants from seed. Others find it daunting to save seeds from their plants, but dislike the idea of purchasing new seeds for the same crops year after year.

Fortunately, there are a great number of food plants that can easily be regrown by saving and replanting just a small portion of the plant after harvest.

Like all vegetables, the following eight plants need light, water, air and nutrients (typically in the form of soil). Though many will thrive best outside, they can all be grown indoors, given sufficient light (five to six hours per day, including in winter), and good drainage.

Super herbs

Some of the easiest and most rewarding plants to grow are green onions. Nearly the entire plant is edible – the leaves taste like chives and the bulbs taste like onions – and if you submerge the inedible roots in water they will resprout into a full plant! So you can just grow the same onion again and again, and meanwhile add plenty of vitamin C and the super-antioxidant quercetin to your diet.

Cilantro, also known as coriander, can sprout from even a single leaf submerged in water. Once the plant has formed roots, it should be transplanted. In addition to providing a distinctive flavor to your dishes, cilantro is also a potent antiseptic and antifungal, aids digestion and helps remove toxic metals from the body.

Basil will also sprout into a full plant from just a single leaf, as long as the stem is just under two inches long. Once the new plant has doubled in size, it should be transplanted. Basil has been shown to lower levels of stress hormones, detoxify the liver, improve respiratory function, lower blood sugar and improve circulation. It is rich in iron and a potent anti-inflammatory.

Perhaps the greatest of the herbs is garlic, a superfood among superfoods. Garlic produces edible leaves, but it is most prized for its pungent bulbs. A single one of these bulbs, if placed in water, will sprout into a full plant.

Garlic is a potent immune booster and one of the broadest spectrum antimicrobial agents known. It has been shown to help prevent cancer and even shrink some cancerous tumors.

Perpetually growing veggies

You’ve heard that potatoes can be regrown from their eyes, but these veggies make that process look downright difficult!

You can regrow bok choy – which is an anti-inflammatory, lowers blood pressure and prevents cancer – by placing the roots in water. Transplant after one to two weeks and harvest again when it reaches full size.

Romaine lettuce needs a little more mass to grow back; save half the plant and place in water. It can be transplanted as soon as the leaves start growing back. You can pick and eat lettuce leaves as the plant grows, adding a rich source of vitamin C to your diet.

Carrots are famous for being rich in beta-carotenes that produce vitamin A, but did you know that beta-carotenes also have cancer-fighting properties? Best of all, carrots are incredibly easy to grow: Just save the top part that you are already cutting off and submerge it in water. Watch the roots and leaves grow almost at once!

You can use a similar trick with celery, submerging the base that is typically cut off and discarded. The celery can be replanted as soon as leaves appear in the center of the plant. While it may have a reputation as having limited nutrient content, celery is actually very rich in micronutrients. It has a long history of use as a medicinal plant, and contains plant compounds that have been shown to boost immune function and stop the growth of cancer cells.

Sources for this article include: