Dr Akilah El – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah El

The Health Benefits of Cucumbers

Most people are unaware of the immense health benefits of cucumber and would avoid eating cucumber where possible. Fresh cucumber may taste “bland” to some but its thirst-quenching and cooling properties are refreshing. It acts as an anti-oxidant when taken together with fried and barbequed foods.

Here’s a list of health benefits of cool cucumber:

Acidity:  The alkalinity of the minerals in cucumber juice effectively helps in regulating the body’s blood pH, neutralizing acidity. The juice is also soothing for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers.

Blood pressure:  Like celery, this colorless drink can help regulate blood pressure because of its minerals and traces of sodium.

Connective tissues, building:  The excellent source of silica contributes to the proper construction of connective tissues in our body as in the bones, muscles, cartilage, ligaments and tendons.

Cooling:  During dry and hot weather, drink a glass of cucumber + celery juice. It wonderfully helps to normalize body temperature.

Diuretic:  Cucumber juice is diuretic, encouraging waste removal through urination. This also helps in the dissolution of kidney stones.

Fever:  The temperature regulating properties in cucumber juice makes it a suitable drink when you have a fever.

Inflammation:  The Chinese think that cucumbers are too “cooling” and not suitable for people with rheumatism. But we know now that cucumber can help counter uric acids that are causing inflammation in joints. When cucumber is taken it does its cleaning work at the joints, thus stirring up pain as it eliminates the uric acid. This means it also help other inflamed conditions like arthritis, asthma, and gout.

Hair growth:  The silicon and sulfur content in cucumber juice makes it especially helpful in promoting hair growth. Drink it mixed with carrot, lettuce or spinach juice.

Puffy eyes:  Some people wake up in the morning with puffy eyes, probably due to too much water retention in the body (or having cried to sleep). To reduce the puffiness, lie down and put two slices of cucumber on the eyes for a good ten minutes.

Skin conditions:  The high amount of vitamin C and anti-oxidants in cucumber makes it an important ingredient in many beauty creams for treating eczema, psoriasis, acne, etc.

Sunburn:  When there is a sunburn, make cucumber juice and rub it on the affected area for a cooling and healing effect.

Water retention: It supplies the necessary electrolytes and restores hydration of the body cells, thus reducing water retention.

Consumption Tips

Choose cucumbers that are dark green in color and firm to the touch. Avoid those that are yellowish or are wrinkled at either ends. Thinner cucumbers have fewer seeds than those that are thicker.

Store cucumbers in the fridge to retain its freshness. Cut cucumbers should be kept wrapped up or in an air-tight container and kept in the fridge. Consume within a day or two.

Caution

Where possible, buy organic as cucumbers may be waxed or have pesticides.

 

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7 Big Herbs You Can Grow at Home

By Erica Glasener – networx.com

I admit it, I live to eat. I also enjoy cooking and having fresh herbs to use for soups, stews and salads. With this in mind I grow herbs in pots and in the ground. As far as I’m concerned one can never have too much basil, parsley or rosemary. The good news is that many of these large herbs are easy to grow and not only are they tasty but they are pretty in pots whether you grow them on their own or combine them with other herbs and flowers.

For best growth and production most herbs need full sun (4 to 6 hours of direct sun) and excellent drainage but you don’t have to have a big garden to grow them. A balcony or window box will suffice. Depending on what part of the country you live in there are annual, biennial and perennial types.

1. Giant Italian Parsley

Giant Italian parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a biennial in Zones 6 to 9, but often grown as an annual. I prefer the taste and look of this giant flat leaf parsley to that of the more common curly parsley. Plants get large and bushy and produce many leaves. In mild climates it stays evergreen all winter.

2. Rosemary

Another evergreen herb, native to the Mediterranean, is rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). A perennial in Zones 8 to 10, it is great for seasoning meats and vegetables. Its delightful scented leaves make it a welcome addition to flower arrangements too. While often seen in small starter pots, rosemary plants will become bush-size if allowed to flourish.

3. Sage

Winter hardy in Zones 5 to 10, sage (Salvia officinalis) can grow 2 to 3’ tall or taller and 2’ wide. This aromatic herb is popular for seasoning meats, sauces and vegetable dishes.

4. Lemon Balm

Also known for its fragrance is the perennial herb lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) hardy inZones 4 to 9. The lemon scented leaves are popular for making teas or adding to baths for a calming effect. Plants easily grow to 2’ tall.

5. Lavender

If you love lavender scented soaps and sachets, try growing some of your own lavender, including the cold hardy English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia); perennial in Zones 5 to 9 and popular as a companion for roses. Spanish or French lavender (Lavandula stoechas) has large showy purple flowers and is also aromatic. Both of these lavenders are good candidates for containers.

6. Large Leaf Italian Basil

Basil (Ocimum basilicum) is a popular herb used (both fresh and dried) for Italian cooking including pizzas, salads, sauces and pesto. Large leaf Italian or lettuce leaf basil (Ocimum basilicum var. crispum) has leaves that look lettuce-like and can be up to 3 to 4 inches long on plants that grow up to 2’ tall. This annual can be started from seed indoors (under grow lights) in late winter and transplanted to the garden or a container outdoors, once the fear of frost is passed. For a contrast try growing the large purple sweet basil too.

7. Hyssop

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) is a perennial herb in Zones 4 to 9. The aromatic leaves are used to season soups, salads, liqueurs and stews. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Like rosemary, this herb will grow as high and wide as a small bush.

About the Author

Erica Glasener is an Atlanta gardener and horticulturist.

8 Habits That May Be Causing You Hypothyroidism

yhroid

Hypothyroidism (when the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone) is especially common, and diet and lifestyle habits are a major contributor. When working on correcting thyroid issues it is important to calm the immune system down by reducing sources of inflammation. Inflammation is a result of poor diet and other stressors, dramatically altering the conversion of TH.

Here are the 8 habits that may be causing you hypothyroidism, and if you already have a thyroid issue, it may get worse.

1. A low fat diet. While a low fat diet is great for losing weight, we tend to overdo it and what happens is we are not getting the nourishing fat that we need. If you notice that your focus is off often or that you have a low attention span AND you have been on a low-fat diet, you may not be getting enough fat to feed your brain. Stop!

2. Take that nap! Are you getting enough sleep? There is something about our society that just holds in high esteem the idea that less is more when it comes to sleep but you can be causing your own hypothyroidism by not sleeping enough.

3.The Yes person! It is hard to say no to all the invites and gatherings but overdoing in the commitment department is just stressful for your body and it can put a strain on your system.

4. Diet soda habit. If you drink diet soda, just stop. It is loaded up with toxic sugar and artificial chemicals. Diet soda doesn’t mean it has no sugar, it is simply that it has artificial sweeteners that are really worse than regular sugar. Quit!

5. Drinking adult beverages. Alcohol even in small amounts can cause you a great deal of issues with your blood sugar levels. It is a habit that you should break immediately.

6. Drinking caffeinated beverages. Caffeine can mess with your entire adrenal system. We all reach for that cup of coffee in the morning or that nice hot cup of tea. Although freshly-brewed coffee may be high in antioxidants, people with thyroid issues should really just avoid it totally.

7. Vegetable oil. If part of your daily habit is to slather on margarine instead of butter and use vegetable oil when you cook, you are furthering the deterioration of your adrenal system.

8. Gluten. A thyroid problem typically means a gluten problem as well. No one is quite sure how they are specifically connected but there is a link. Gluten intolerance cannot really be tested for. Just give up gluten for 30 days and see how it works out for you. If you feel better after 30 days then you know that gluten is adding to your issues.

Hypothyroidism can cause so many problems in your life from health problems to relationship problems (because you are too tired to deal with people). Taking simple steps to adjust your diet and lifestyle can easily improve the quality of life while you get your thyroid back on track.

 

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The Health Benefits of Cabbage

cabbage

 

The anti-cancer properties in cabbage makes it a powerfully healing food in combating the much feared disease, cancer. Studies after studies have shown that fresh cabbage juice has been effective in the treatment of a number of cancers and ulceration in the digestive tracts.

Anemia:  The super healing effect of the superior chlorophyll in cabbage has been found to be good for blood building.

Breast engorgement:  Peel off the outer layers of cabbage, run it slightly under the rolling pin and cap it over the breasts as close to the skin as possible, to soothe breasts engorgement. Wear your maternity brassiere over the cabbage and leave till the cabbage leaves wither. I have tried this and found it to be rather soothing, the preferred natural and cheaper alternative over taking drugs.

Cancer:  Daily and frequent consumption of cabbage juice has shown to be effective in preventing and treating cancers of the breast, colon, liver, lung and ovarian. A compound in cabbage, sulforaphane, also helps protect cells from invasion of carcinogens.

Constipation:  The slightly laxative effect of cabbage makes it effective in stimulating bowel movement. Eat the uncooked cabbage, either on its own, or juiced.

Digestive system:  The amino acid glutamine in cabbage juice is totally gentle and cleansing on the digestive system, detoxifying, repairing ulcers, healing and regenerating. The juice is to be taken in small amounts of about 100 ml, three times a day on an empty stomach.

Immune system:  A compound called histidine in cabbage is found to be useful in treating allergies and regulating the T-cells in our immune systems.

Skin wounds:  Flatten layers of cabbage leaves with a rolling pin, and wrap it around affected areas of wound—blisters, sores, skin eruptions (as in psoriasis), burns and ulcers. Keep in place with a bandage, until the leaves turn yellow then change the leaves and repeat till wounds heal. In between changes, clean and dry wounds.

Stomach and intestinal tracts:  The high sulphur, chlorine and iodine content in cabbage have the significant ability in cleansing the mucus membranes in the tracts.

Weight loss:  A substance in cabbage inhibits the conversion of sugar and other carbohydrates into fat, definitely a painless way of dieting.

Consumption Tips

When buying cabbage, choose the smaller variety, they taste better.

Cabbage is easier to digest in its raw fresh form than when cooked. The longer it is cooked, the less digestible it becomes. Cabbage sprouts are delicate and easier to digest, and they also contain higher levels of nutrients.

Avoid buying precut cabbage that are either halved or shredded. The moment the cabbage is cut, it begins to lose its nutrient contents. To store, keep the vegetable refrigerated in a perforated plastic bag to prevent loss of its vitamin C.

Caution

Raw cabbage juice may be unpalatable for some people, but the health benefits of its raw state is immense. You can also use the purple cabbage as they are the sweeter variety.

To make it easier on the taste buds, mix your cabbage juice with any of these: carrot, green apple, celery, cucumber, spinach or even a slice of lemon (with peel).

Take raw cabbage juice in small amounts initially if you are unfamiliar with drinking vegetable juice, gradually increasing.

Cabbage consumption may cause gas in some people, especially when cooked. In this case, add a few slices of turmeric in cooking to prevent gas, or limit your cabbage intake.

 

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Having Low Cholesterol Can Harm Your Health

Low-CholesterolBy Sayer Ji

You’ve heard for decades about the dangers of high cholesterol, but did you know that LOW cholesterol can lead to violence towards self and other, and has been linked to premature aging, death and other adverse health effects?

In a world gone mad with anti-cholesterol anxiety, and where gobbling down pharmaceuticals designed to poison the body into no longer synthesizing it is somehow considered sane behavior, it is refreshing to look at some of the research on the health benefits of cholesterol, or conversely, the dangers of low cholesterol.

Benefits of Cholesterol

Cholesterol Is Needed To Prevent Aggression

It has been known for almost 30 years that low serum cholesterol levels are associated with habitually violent tendencies of homicidal offenders under the influence of alcohol.[i] Since then, there are at least 8 other studies that have either confirmed or explored the cholesterol-violence link, including both violence towards self and other. One of the possible explanations for this association was discussed in an article published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 1993: “One of the functions of serotonin in the central nervous system is the suppression of harmful behavior impulses…Low membrane cholesterol decreases the number of serotonin receptors. Since membrane cholesterol exchanges freely with cholesterol in the surrounding medium, a lowered serum cholesterol concentration may contribute to a decrease in brain serotonin, with poorer suppression of aggressive behavior”. Not surprisingly, several reports have now surfaced on cholesterol-lowering statin drugs contributing to irritability and/or aggression.

Cholesterol Is Needed To Fight Cancer

The inverse relationship between cholesterol levels and the risk for a variety of cancers, and mortality associated with cancer, has been known about since the late 80’s. Since then, the cholesterol-cancer connection has been confirmed over and over again. It is to be expected, therefore, that statin drug use would be linked with increased cancer incidence, which indeed it is.[iv] Even when you take so-called “bad” LDL-cholesterol and administer it to a culture of highly malignant, multi-drug resistant leukemia cells, the cells lose their resistance to chemotherapy. Not exactly what can be characterized as a “bad” substance now is it?

Cholesterol Is Needed To Prevent Hemorrhagic Stroke

There are two types of stroke:

1) Ischemic, associated with lack of blood flow and oxygen to the brain

2) Hemorrhagic, associated with the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain, and bleeding.

The risk for the former, in theory, could be raised in the presence of excessive oxidized cholesterol. However, it is the risk for the second, hemorrhagic stroke, which is increased when cholesterol levels are low. Noted as far back as 1994 in the British Medical Journal, in an article titled, “Assessing possible hazards of reducing serum cholesterol,” researchers found “The only cause of death attributable to low serum cholesterol concentration was haemorrhagic stroke.” Other studies can be viewed that confirm this association on our stroke-cholesterol link page.

Cholesterol Is Needed for Memory

Low HDL cholesterol has been identified as a risk factor for deficit and decline in memory in midlife. Even in Parkinson’s disease, higher total serum cholesterol concentrations are associated with slower clinical progression of the disease. Statin drugs, which inhibit the production of cholesterol, hence severely affecting the brain, are now required by the FDA to display the black box warning that they may adversely affect the memory. We have indexed over 50 studies from the National Library of Medicine’s bibliographic database, Medline, on the neurotoxicity of statin drugs, with six of these specifically addressing statin-induced memory impairment.

Cholesterol is Needed for Longevity

In a fascinating study published in PLoS in 2011, telomere length – the shoestring cap-like ends of the chromosomes which prevent DNA damage associated with cellular aging – was linked to higher LDL and total cholesterol levels. The longer the length of these protective caps, the higher the cholesterol. Indeed, several studies indicate that lower cholesterol is associated with increased mortality.

Cholesterol Helps Us Fight Infection

It has been observed that a cholesterol-rich diet improves patients with tuberculosis, leading researchers to suggest “cholesterol should be used as a complementary measure in antitubercular treatment.” Cholesterol-lowering drugs, incidentally, exhibit immunosuppressive and potent immunotoxic properties, likely in part due to their cholesterol depleting effects.

Given that cholesterol is essential for all animal life and that each cell is capable of synthesizing it from simpler molecules, we should not be surprised by examples provided above of cholesterol’s significant health benefits. Nor should it be surprising that cholesterol-lowering drugs have over 300 adverse health effectsFor now, suffice it to say, that conventional medical practice would do well to receive instruction from basic principles of biology, rather than simply the drug-company marketing copy it increasingly falls prey to.

 

Here is a list of our links.

 

About the Author

Sayer Ji is the founder and director of GreenMedInfo.com and co-author of the book The Cancer Killers: The Cause Is The Cure with New York Times best-seller Dr. Ben Lerner and Dr. Charles Majors. His writings and research have been published in the Wellbeing Journal, the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, and have been featured on Mercola.com, NaturalNews.com, Reuters.com, GaryNull.com, Infowars.com and Care2.com.

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