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Effective Eating Tips to Prevent Fatigue

In today’s fast-paced world many of us suffer from fatigue. Fatigue from being over-extended between family, work and children responsibilities. Fatigue from lack of rest, poor diet and poor sleeping habits. And fatigue from just being too tired.

People can look to healthy eating to prevent fatigue because we really are what we eat. Our bodies use the nutrition we provide it to build cells and produce energy. If the nutrition is a twinkie and a soda then the energy we produce will be substandard.

If you are searching for healthy eating to prevent fatigue then you must avoid the foods that give you an initial boost of energy but then leave you flat on your face. These foods include most that are high in sugar such as cookies, candy, soda, fruit drinks, and other foods with caffeine such as chocolate and coffee. These are an effective short-term solution to a long-term problem. Work on getting rid of them slowly so you will have a better feeling for your more natural energy.

There are other foods that cause an immediate problem instead of a boost and then fall in your energy levels. These foods include carbohydrates that will cause you to be drowsy because of the altered level of serotonin in your brain. They may be good before bedtime snacks but not to treat the mid-day slump.

Healthy Eating Habits Help Prevent Disease

If you are searching for healthy eating habits to prevent fatigue then you must avoid the foods that give you an initial boost of energy but then leave you flat on your face.

These foods include most that are high in sugar such as cookies, candy, soda, fruit drinks, and other foods with caffeine such as chocolate and coffee.

These are an effective short-term solution to a long-term problem. Work on getting rid of them slowly so you will have a better feeling for your more natural energy. There are other foods that cause an immediate problem instead of a boost and then fall in your energy levels.

These foods include carbohydrates that will cause you to be drowsy because of the altered level of serotonin in your brain. They may be good before bedtime snacks but not to treat the mid-day slump.

Positive Action to Prevent Causes of Fatigue

Now let’s focus on what you should do instead of what you shouldn’t do to prevent fatigue.

One trick to help prevent the afternoon nap is to eat pure protein at lunch.

Protein will be broken down in digestion into amino-acid building blocks that increase the production of chemicals, which will increase your level of alertness and energy.

For instance your lunch might be broiled fish and a few vegetables or a hard boiled egg and tuna.

You can include a few carbohydrates later in the day when you are past the 2-4 o’clock slump in the mid-afternoon.

Quality Nutritional Supplements Help Reduce Fatigue

Healthy eating also includes getting enough of the necessary vitamins and minerals that support your body’s function. One of those is iron.

Many women don’t get enough iron and loose it each month with their period. Unless it’s replaced you can suffer from iron deficiency anemia, which leads to chronic fatigue.

You should also get as many fruits and vegetables as possible. The USDA recommends we eat 7 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Most people don’t come anywhere close.

Many people swear by a natural herb boost each day. In the mid-afternoon a tea from ginseng and ginkgo biloba may be just what you need.

Lack of exercise is also one of the causes of fatigue.

It may seem counter-intuitive but exercise will actually increase the amount of energy you have each day.

Getting 30 minutes of exercise during lunchtime will help to boost your metabolism and keep your engines running for the afternoon.

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Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

8 Sneaky Ways To Burn Calories Without Going To The Gym

Activity is not just about “exercise,” it’s about moving your body more all day long. This type of light activity is essential, whether you’re a card-carrying couch potato or a marathon runner. Growing evidence finds that too much sitting harms your heart health. Worse, that damage is not easily undone by jumping on the elliptical trainer for 30 minutes in the morning if you spend the other 23 ½ hours sleeping and sitting.  A recent study of 1,579 people found that people whose jobs require more than 6 hours of chair time a day are 68% more likely to wind up overweight than those who sit less.

The solution: Stand more. By using these tips you’ll be in motion more all day long. That alone could be enough to help you shed stubborn pounds for good. 

1.  Limit yourself to one TV show: Watching TV is a great way to unwind. But when it comes to the tube, there’s such a thing as too much downtime. The average American tunes in for 3 hours a day, which is really bad news for your waistline, especially when you consider that watching TV burns only slightly more calories than sleeping. Harvard researchers have found that every 2 hours spent watching television increases the likelihood of obesity by 23% and raises your risk of developing diabetes by 14%. Trade 1 hour of TV time for one long walk, and you can slash your obesity risk by 24% and lower your risk of diabetes by 34%. 

2.  Step it up: There’s a reason an exercise machine called the Stair-Master exists: Taking the stairs is really, really good exercise! In one study, exercise scientists calculated that by taking just two more flights of stairs (up and down) each day, you could burn off 6 pounds in a year. Find excuses to make multiple trips between floors at work (using a restroom on another floor is one way) and at home.



3.  Walk the halls at work:
When you’re stuck for ideas at work, get up and walk the halls. Stand and stretch during phone calls. Twice a day, get up and walk to talk to a colleague instead of e-mailing. Stanford University researchers calculated that if you were to walk across your office building and back to talk to a coworker instead of spending the same 2 minutes e-mailing, you could spare yourself 11 pounds over 10 years–effectively avoiding the “midlife spread.”

4.  Stand at your desk: Here’s a very simple move that every office worker can do: Stand up. Sitting at your desk for an hour burns 63 calories. Standing burns 127, twice as many. If you have a cordless phone, you might even be able to pace a bit, just to get the blood flowing even more. Many workplaces are now offering drafting-style tables and high chairs for office workers, which gives you the option of working on your feet most of the day and sitting down to take breaks (instead of the other way around–standing when you need a break). Ask your human resources manager about them. You’ll be surprised how much more energy you have when you spend your day on your feet rather than in your seat.

5.  Sitting at desk on swiss ballGet on the ball: Sit on a large stability or Swiss ball while checking e-mail in the evening. It’s an easy way to engage all of your muscles for 15 to 20 minutes. You might even be inspired to do a few stretches and crunches after you log off.


6.  Fire the maid and gardener:
All those services that you hire to make your life easier can also end up making you heavier. Small daily tasks, like weeding the garden, mowing the lawn, trimming hedges, and cleaning house, can add up to an aerobic workout. In a 2-year study of 230 overweight and inactive men and women, researchers at the Cooper Institute, an aerobics-research organization in Dallas, found that those who spent 30 minutes a day raking the lawn, taking the stairs, and walking from far spaces in parking lots achieved the same improvements in fitness, blood pressure, and body fat as those who went to the gym for vigorous exercise 20 to 60 minutes at a time, 5 days a week.

7.  Prep yourself slim: Cooking is a great wayo burn calories. Slicing, dicing, and braising burns twice as many , in fact, as calling your Chinese takeout place. Because you’re in charge of the ingredients, cook with metabolism-boosting ingredients like those from the Active Calorie Diet. Limit takeout and delivery to two meals a week, tops. 

8. Consider a stepper: Office workers are ideal candidates for a portable mini stepper like the Stamina InStride Electronic Mini Stepper–essentially, just two small Stair-climber  -like pedals without the giant machine attached. Research from the Mayo Clinic found that workers who used these clever step devices while making phone calls or answering e-mail burned an extra 290 calories an hour–enough to burn off more than 40 pounds over the course of a year if they used the machines just 2 hours a day. The strategy is a little unconventional but worth considering. The stepper is relatively inexpensive and small enough to slide under your desk when you’re not using it. Stepping is also something you can do while watching TV at night.

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To learn more about other weight loss tips or to have a personalize fitness program created for your weight lost goals browse through our fitness page by clicking here

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The 8 Time Slots When You’re Naturally At Your Best

It’s not just your energy level or weight that fluctuates over the course of a day. Did you know that your brain obeys its own rhythm too? It’s based largely on your human clock, sleep pattern, exposure to light, and genetic makeup—and getting in a groove with its tempo can make you healthier, happier, and have more energy.

As cutting-edge research shows, you can burn more calories from exercise, work more efficiently and improve concentration, and even have better sex by learning how to synch up to your circadian rhythm and brain’s power hours. Here’s your daily guide.

7 to 9 AM: Best for Passion

“The perfect moment for bonding with your spouse is right when you wake up,” says Ilia Karatsoreos, PhD, a neuroscientist at Rockefeller University. The reason: Levels of oxytocin (aka the “love hormone”) are sky-high upon waking, making it the best time for intimacy of all kinds.

These are the hours to strengthen your relationship with the most important people in your life. Wake up feeling frisky and need more than just cuddling? Your husband’s brain is on nearly the same wavelength; British researchers found high morning oxytocin levels in men gradually decreased as the day wore on.

Tap into it: Make love or cuddle. Tell your partner how much you love him. Call your child at college (so long as it’s not the weekend!). Pen a thank-you note to a friend.

9 to 11 AM: Best for Creativity

Your brain now has moderate levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which in reasonable amounts can actually help your mind focus, says Sung Lee, MD, secretary of the International Brain Education Association. It’s present at any age: A University of Michigan study found that college students and retired adults were both mentally quick in the morning—but among older subjects, sharpness declined in the afternoon.

Because you’re primed for learning, take on tasks that require analysis and concentration. “From middle age on, you’re more alert early in the day,” says Carolyn Yoon, PhD, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Michigan who worked on the study. Schedule discussions that involve personal or family matters, as others will be sharp during these hours as well.

Tap into it: Develop a new idea. Write a presentation. Brainstorm solutions to challenges, large or small. Have an important convo with your doctor.

11 AM to 2 PM: Best for Tough Tasks

By now, levels of the sleep hormone melatonin have dipped sharply from their late evening and early morning peaks. This means you’re more ready to take on a load of projects, according to German researchers. They found that reaction time and the ability to accomplish several to-dos were strong in the middle of the day.

Tear through that list—because of your mental quickness, this time of day is best for taking action. One tip: Cross items off one at a time, says René Marois, PhD, director of the Human Information Processing Laboratory at Vanderbilt University. Attempts to juggle tasks simultaneously put additional demands on your brain, making you more likely to lose concentration and make slip-ups.

Tap into it: Plow through voice mails or e-mails. Give a presentation to a client or boss. Iron out a tough problem with your spouse.

2 to 3 PM: Best for a Break

To digest your lunch, your body draws blood away from your brain to your stomach, says Lee. Aim to eat lunch closer to 2 PM, as the midday meal can make you wish there was a couch to crash on close by. Your body’s circadian rhythm (the biological “clock” that regulates sleep and wakefulness) is also in a brief down phase during this time, according to a Harvard study.

Steer clear of your workload and play around on Facebook or flip through magazines. If you’re at work and need to fight off drowsiness, take a quick, brisk walk around the block or drink some water—both will get blood moving away from your belly and toward your head. “Water increases vascular volume and circulation, promoting blood flow to your brain,” he says.

Tap into it: Meditate or pray. Read for pleasure—Web sites, magazines, or newspapers. Go for a stroll.

3 to 6 PM: Best for Collaboration

“The brain is pretty fatigued by now,” says Paul Nussbaum, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist and author of Your Brain Health Lifestyle. That doesn’t mean you’re stressed, however: University of Michigan scientists found that cortisol levels usually decline in women by late afternoon.

Although your brain is not as sharp as earlier, you’re more easygoing, so plan a low-pressure meeting for now. If you’ve already left work, pick an activity that is as different from your job as possible, suggests Nussbaum. Exercise is a perfect one: Studies show that grip strength, manual dexterity, and other physical skills are at their strongest by evening, but if you work out too late, the residual adrenaline may interfere with sleep for some people. A gym session right before dinner solves the problem.

Tap into it: Brainstorm with coworkers. Strength-train.

6 to 8 PM: Best for Personal Tasks

Between these hours, researchers have found that the brain enters something called “wake maintenance,” when its production of sleep-friendly melatonin is at an all-day low. As a result, chances of getting tired now are next to none. Studies also show that your tastebuds are lit up during these hours because of circadian variations in hormone levels.

Keep your energy up by exposing yourself to the last of the day’s serotonin-stimulating sunlight. Now may be a good time to walk the dog or walk yourself to the grocery store. And because you’re now more alert but no longer at work, direct your renewed burst of mental energy toward your husband and kids and maybe some friends; you’re bound to be pretty engaging about now.

Tap into it: Run errands. Clean a long-overdue room in your house. Enjoy quality time with your family members. Whip up a delicious meal.

8 to 10 PM: Best for Relaxing

There’s an abrupt transition from being wide awake to feeling sleepy as melatonin levels rise quickly, report Australian and British researchers. Meanwhile, levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter tied to perkiness, start to fade. “Eighty percent of serotonin is stimulated from exposure to daylight, so now you’re slowing down,” says Rubin Naiman, PhD, sleep specialist and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine.

Now’s the time to ease into relaxing, “mindless” activities (save the crossword puzzle for the morning). “By nightfall, when your brain is tired, this is a good way to bring yourself down, like walking a lap or two after a big workout,” says Naiman.

Tap into it: Unwind by watching a funny movie. Try a low-key, repetitive activity, such as knitting.

10 PM onward: Best for Snoozing

Your brain is looking to knit together all it learned today, which it does during sleep. Your top priority should be getting a full night’s rest. Sleep can inspire insight: In one study, more than half of those taught a task thought of an easier way to do it after 8 hours of sleep. Adjusting lighting can help: Dim the rooms you occupy after dinner to let your body know the day is ending, suggests Naiman. In a few hours, your brain will be ready to start all over again.

Whatever helps you get to sleep—and it may take adjustments over time—follow your routine consistently. Just make sure you sign off early enough so you get the 7 to 9 hours of shut-eye recommended for optimal health and energy.

Tap into it: Curl up with a good book. Write in your journal. Drift off while reading something you want to remember in the morning.

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