Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: research

Gardasil (HPV Vaccine) Related Death Rate Rising Among Women

Gardasil vaccine has been distributed around the world as a method of prevention for cervical cancer caused by the human papilloma virus. The vaccine, which is made by Merck is marketed to young girls and teens as a way of preventing four strains of HPV that are known to raise risks for cervical cancer. As of May 31, 2010 around 29.5 million doses of the vaccine were spread across the United States alone. There have been 53 deaths reported to the VAERS after Gardasil injections, and if physicians and health officials can work to establish more accurate reporting, we may soon see those numbers go much higher.

From as far away as India and New Zealand reports of life-altering illness and even death are being heard–and could be linked to Gardasil. Many of these reactions have occurred just days or weeks after the shot in previously healthy young girls. Concerned parents no longer have thriving teenage girls, but instead are playing nurse maid to the chronically ill, or grieving a loss that could be linked to Gardasil.

The Centers for Disease Control in conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration are working closely with others in the medical field to try to determine a link between Gardasil and diseases like Guillian Barre syndrome, and Lou Gehrig’s disease. The CDC states that as of May of this year there were over 16,000 reports to the vaccine adverse reaction database (known as VAERS) related to reactions after Garadsil injections. Some reactions the CDC calls “non-serious” and includes fainting, nausea, pain and swelling of the injection site.Others are considered “serious. “ To be classified as serious, the reaction should “involve hospitalization, permanent disability, life-threatening illness, and death.” The CDC reports that only 8% of the 16,000 were considered serious. That percentage may seem small, but for the families who have fallen victim to the side effects of Gardasil, it is anything but.

Unfortunately the CDC and FDA will have an even harder time determining just how many adverse reactions have occurred from Gardasil simply because of spotty reporting from physicians. When doctors report to the VAERS, they are often failing to give identifying information like name or address of the patient which makes it impossible for the CDC to follow up on leads. If the true number of reactions was known, and physicians were reporting reactions properly we may have seen an even more dramatic set of numbers related to Gardasil and its link to disease and death rates.

Government health officials say that although they have been able to verify that Gardasil was given prior to the deaths of 29 out of the 53 cases reported so far, that there still is no definitive link that proves Gardasil was the cause.

So how much higher are the numbers of young women and girls who took their vaccine and then fell ill, only to have it called a “coincidence” that was never reported? We may never know the real numbers but if physicians could be properly trained on how and what to report we could soon see that Gardasil is much more damaging than originally thought.

There are now 20,101 reports of adverse reactions and 84 deaths attributed to the HPV vaccines. In September a healthy 40-day old breastfed infant died the day after its mother received her first Gardasil injection. These are serious incidents.

Sane Vax Inc. has written a letter to Dr. Margaret Hamburg, FDA Commissioner requesting the vaccine be taken off the market.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20101025005268/en/S.A.N.E.-Vax-Asks-FDA-Rescind-Approval-Gardasil

And of course at http://truthaboutgardasil.org

 

For natural remedies and methods to prevent and eliminate HPV or Cervical Cancer please contact Dr Akilah El

Click here to Read Dr Akiah’s inspiring story of how she cured herself natually of stage 4 cervical cancer

The Real Reason For Weight Gain

Over the past several decades Americans have steadily gotten fatter. Although our increasingly sedentary lifestyles are partly to blame, a big reason for our national weight gain is that we’re simply eating more.

In the mid-2000s, government surveys show, the average American adult ate about 2,375 calories per day, nearly one-third more than he (or she) did in the late 1970s. What accounts for all those added calories?

According to a new study, the biggest single contributor to the sharp rise in calorie intake has been the number of snacks and meals people eat per day. Over the past 30-odd years, the study found, Americans have gone from consuming 3.8 snacks and meals per day to 4.9, on average—a 29 percent increase.

The average portion size has increased, too, but only by about 12 percent. And, surprisingly, the average number of calories per 1-gram serving of food (known as “energy density”) actually declined slightly over that period, which suggests that calorie-rich food has played a relatively minor role in our expanding waistlines.

“The real reason we seem to be eating more [calories] is we’re eating often,” says the lead author of the study, Barry Popkin, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “The frequency of eating is probably, for the average overweight adult, becoming a huge issue.”

Popkin blames food advertising and other marketing for the shift from three square meals a day to near-constant eating.

“It’s all about making people think they want to have something in their hands all the time,” he says. “Why are we snacking all the time and munching all the time? [Food] is there, it’s available all the time, it’s tasty. It’s not very healthy, but it’s tasty. It’s sweet, it’s salty, it’s fatty—it’s all the things we love.”

Lisa Young, Ph.D., an adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University and the author of The Portion Teller, agrees that the ubiquity of snack foods has helped drive overeating.

“You never used to see food staring you in the face when you went to…a drugstore,” says Young, who was not involved in the new research. “It’s in your face and it’s cheap. You go get a magazine, you can get a candy bar.”

To tease apart how eating habits have shaped calorie intake, Popkin and a coauthor analyzed data from four nationally representative food surveys conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1977 and 2006. Their analysis, which appears in the June issue of the journal PLoS Medicine, was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.

The findings weren’t entirely unexpected. In a previous study, Popkin and his coauthor found that the amount of time between snacks and meals has shrunk substantially since 1977, while the amount of calories consumed from snacks has risen dramatically.

Christopher Gardner, PhD, the director of nutrition studies at Stanford University’s Prevention Research Center, in Palo Alto, Calif., says that although the new findings ring true, the survey-based approach Popkin and his colleague used has some inherent limitations.

Despite being nationally representative, the surveys didn’t follow the same individuals over time, and in some cases also used different questions and methods, Gardner points out. Moreover, they relied on the participants’ memory of what they’d eaten in the previous 24 hours, which can be unreliable.

“When people try to describe the portion sizes they are consuming, they are often inaccurate,” Gardner says, adding that similar inaccuracies may crop up when recalling and calculating the energy density of specific foods. In fact, he says, the number of meals and snacks may be easiest of all to remember and track, which may have somewhat exaggerated its importance to total calorie intake.

But Gardner, too, says that frequent—and often mindless—snacking has come to seem normal.

In our food-filled environment, Young says, “We need to be conscious of when we eat, how much we eat, and what we eat.”

Young recommends sticking with three meals a day and choosing healthy snacks (such as fruits and vegetables) rather than processed foods. “And keep your portions in check,” she says.

.

GET MORE FREE HEALTH TIPS LIKE THIS FROM OUR WEBSITE

Watermelon: A Natural Viagra

A cold slice of watermelon has long been a Fourth of July holiday staple. But according to recent studies, the juicy fruit may be better suited for Valentine’s Day. That’s because scientists say watermelon has ingredients that deliver Viagra-like effects to the body’s blood vessels and may even increase libido.

“The more we study watermelons, the more we realize just how amazing a fruit it is in providing natural enhancers to the human body,” said Dr. Bhimu Patil, director of Texas A&M’s Fruit and Vegetable Improvement Center in College Station.

“We’ve always known that watermelon is good for you, but the list of its very important healthful benefits grows longer with each study.”

Beneficial ingredients in watermelon and other fruits and vegetables are known as phyto-nutrients, naturally occurring compounds that are bioactive, or able to react with the human body to trigger healthy reactions, Patil said.

In watermelons, these include lycopene, beta carotene and the rising star among its phyto-nutrients – citrulline – whose beneficial functions are now being unraveled. Among them is the ability to relax blood vessels, much like Viagra does.

Scientists know that when watermelon is consumed, citrulline is converted to arginine through certain enzymes. Arginine is an amino acid that works wonders on the heart and circulation system and maintains a good immune system, Patil said.

“The citrulline-arginine relationship helps heart health, the immune system and may prove to be very helpful for those who suffer from obesity and type 2 diabetes,” said Patil. “Arginine boosts nitric oxide, which relaxes blood vessels, the same basic effect that Viagra has, to treat erectile dysfunction and maybe even prevent it.”

While there are many psychological and physiological problems that can cause impotence, extra nitric oxide could help those who need increased blood flow, which would also help treat angina, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular problems.

“Watermelon may not be as organ specific as Viagra,” Patil said, “but it’s a great way to relax blood vessels without any drug side-effects.”

The benefits of watermelon don’t end there, he said. Arginine also helps the urea cycle by removing ammonia and other toxic compounds from our bodies.

Citrulline, the precursor to arginine, is found in higher concentrations in the rind of watermelons than the flesh. As the rind is not commonly eaten, two of Patil’s fellow scientists, drs. Steve King and Hae Jeen Bang, are working to breed new varieties with higher concentrations in the flesh.

In addition to the research by Texas A&M, watermelon’s phyto-nutrients are being studied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service in Lane, Oklahoma.

As an added bonus, these studies have also shown that deep red varieties of watermelon have displaced the tomato as the lycopene king, Patil said. Almost 92 percent of watermelon is water, but the remaining 8 percent is loaded with lycopene, an anti-oxidant that protects the human heart, prostate and skin health.

“Lycopene, which is also found in red grapefruit, was historically thought to exist only in tomatoes,” he said. “But now we know that it’s found in higher concentrations in red watermelon varieties.”

Lycopene, however, is fat-soluble, meaning that it needs certain fats in the blood for better absorption by the body, Patil said.

“Previous tests have shown that lycopene is much better absorbed from tomatoes when mixed in a salad with oily vegetables like avocado or spinach,” Patil said. “That would also apply to the lycopene from watermelon, but I realize mixing watermelon with spinach or avocadoes is a very hard sell.”

No studies have been conducted to determine the timing of the consumption of oily vegetables to improve lycopene absorption, he said.

“One final bit of advice for those Fourth of July watermelons you buy,” Patil said. “They store much better uncut if you leave them at room temperature. Lycopene levels can be maintained even as it sits on your kitchen floor. But once you cut it, refrigerate. And enjoy. It is suggested that you would have to eat 1560g of water melon as a starting dose to see “performance increases”

 .

Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

The Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Benefits of Cinnamon have been known for over 5,000 years and were recognised by the Egyptians, Ancient Romans, and in Ayurvedic Medicine in Ceylon. Cinnamon is the brown bark of the Cinnamon tree, and is available in a dried, tubular form known as a quills, or as a Ground powder.

Benefits of Cinnamon include

• lower LDL cholesterol ( the bad cholesterol ), total cholesterol, and triglycerides.

• have a regulatory effect on blood sugar levels, making it particularly helpful for people that suffer from type 2 diabetes.

• have an anti-clotting effect on the blood.

• inhibit bacterial growth and food spoilage when added to food, making it a natural food preservative.

• boost cognitive function and memory when smelt.

• a source of manganese, fibre, iron, and calcium.

• the combination of calcium and fibre in cinnamon can help to remove bile, which prevents damage to colon, which helps prevent colon cancer.

• stop the growth of bacteria and fungi (such as the common yeast, Candida)

However you must ensure that you buy real Cinnamon and not Cassia a substitute for real Cinnamon. The Cinnamon sold in the USA and Canada is mostly Casssia.

Research on Cinnamon

Studies have shown that just 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon per day can lower LDL cholesterol.

Several studies suggest that cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, making it especially beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes.

In some studies, cinnamon has shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections.

In a study published by researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Maryland, cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.

It has an anti-clotting effect on the blood.

In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month.

When added to food, it inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative.

One study found that smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory.

Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices.

It is a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

.

.

Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

 

Hamburgers Linked To Asthma In Children

Children who eat a Mediterranean diet have a lower risk of developing asthma, but eating three or more burgers a week is linked to a higher risk, research suggests.

Researchers looked at 50,000 children from 20 countries.

Writing in the journal Thorax, they said eating fruit, vegetables and fish appeared to protect against asthma.

But they said eating burgers could be linked to other unhealthy habits, which may be the real trigger factor.

The study looked at the habits of children in both wealthy and poorer countries between 1995 and 2005. Parents were asked about their children’s diets, and whether they had ever been diagnosed with asthma or had suffered wheezing.

The effects of their diet seemed to vary depending on where they lived.

Fruit and vegetables appeared to be more protective in less affluent parts of the world, while eating lots of fish was more helpful in richer countries.

Eating at least three burgers a week was linked to a greater risk of asthma and wheezing, but only in wealthier countries.

Dr Gabriele Nagel, one of the authors, said this may be because asthma is a collection of symptoms rather than a single condition, and different things may trigger it in different parts of the world.

“This gives us more understanding of how asthma affects different people, and its effects in developing as well as developed countries,” she said.

The paper suggested that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may be helpful because of the protective effects of antioxidants and vitamin C.

High levels of unhealthy fats in burgers could increase the risk of asthma. However, the authors said children who ate several burgers a week were likely to have other unhealthy lifestyle habits as well.

The study did not adjust for levels of obesity.

Obesity link

Asthma UK said the paper helped add to the understanding of how asthma and diet are connected.

But it urged caution because children’s weight can have a significant influence on asthma symptoms.

Dr Elaine Vickers, research relations manager at Asthma UK, said: “Previous studies have shown that a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruit and vegetables can help to reduce a child’s risk of developing asthma symptoms.

“Our advice to parents is therefore to ensure that children eat a healthy, balanced diet and also get plenty of exercise.”

Dr Keith Prowse from the British Lung Foundation said further investigation was needed for more conclusive evidence about the effects of diet and lifestyle.

“We would like to reinforce the need for children to have a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle,” he said.

 

.

.

Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page