Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: quotes

It’s Time To Let Go…

theartoflettingGOBy Susan Harper Todd – WakeUp-World.com

A New Dawn is upon us… A New Way of Being… It is time …It is time to let go of all that is not real… It is time for us to stop being who we are not…It is time, now, for us just to be us! It is time to stop pretending to be something else and someone else to please other people or to fit in. It’s time to realise that there is no ‘one’ way to live our lives. To realise that there is no ‘right’ way to do anything…only our way. We do not have to meditate in a certain way, or even meditate at all…if it doesn’t feel right for us. We don’t have to ‘be’ spiritual in a certain way. We don’t have to ‘be spiritual’,because we already are. Just being us is the perfect thing to be – without trying!

We don’t have to be or do anything at all that we don’t want to do or if it doesn’t feel right for us. It’s time to understand that the right things for us are those things that feel right – those things that make us laugh, make us smile, bring us joy, make us feel wonderful! Those things we feel passionate about, that we really want to do. Those things that we LOVE. For this is truly who we really are – we are all of those things. And when we are doing and being these things we are honouring who we are. It’s time to let go of feeling guilty about enjoying ourselves and doing what we love because doing things we love is an expression of our real selves.

It’s time to stop listening to others and to start listening to us. It’s time to pay attention to what feels right for us in every area of our life. Because we are the only experts on us. No one else is. We are unique. One size does not fit all. There are no rules we should follow in order for us to be ‘us’, except ones we make for ourselves – because they feel right.

It’s time to start listening to our bodies, because only our own body can tell us what it needs to ‘feed’ it and to keep it healthy. We know whenever we eat or drink something whether it is good for us or not, by how it makes us feel. No one else can tell us this for they don’t know how our body feels. When someone tells us that a particular food or drink is good, or not, for us…that maybe true for them, but it certainly is not necessarily true for us. It’s time to let go of the thought that other people know what is best for us and to start asking ‘our selves’, our intuition, what is best for us. We do know…

Its time to start paying attention to how we feel about things instead of what we think about them. It’s time to stop listening to our mind and to stop taking notice of what the media tells us…because what the media is saying is not necessarily true for us. We can tell that by how it makes us feel. Does it make you feel fearful? If it does then it is not true for you! However if you keep focusing on it then it may well become true for you. Instead take your power back and focus instead on something better, more wonderful, something that feels good… Remember, the media’s job is to keep us in fear, because then we are more malleable , easier to control… They want us to keep listening to them, because the minute we stop doing that and start paying attention to ourselves instead, then we are in charge, not them…

Its time for us to stand up and be who we really are. It’s time to stop saying yes when we mean no. It’s time to put ourselves first and do those things that make us feel good, because when we do that, we feel so good that we want to do loving things for everyone around us. When we feel good the world feels good.

It’s time for us to step out of the old patterns that we have inherited from our ancestors. And we know what those are. They are patterns that have kept us small, unseen and unheard. They have made us feel unworthy and unimportant. They have made us feel that everyone matters but us and that it is our job to make everyone else feel that they matter… But that is not who we really are. And deep inside we know that. We really know that.

theartoflettingGO3Stand Up… Stand Tall… Look in the mirror… It’s time…. You can do this… You are not alone… Because it’s our time…it’s already  happening.

Its time to throw away the rule books that tell us how we should live our lives. All we need to do is to just be ‘us’. If we can just pay attention to how we are feeling in every moment, then we will start to know and understand that if we’re not feeling good, then that is our intuition, the greater part of who we are, giving us a message that we’re not doing the right thing for us in that moment…or maybe we’re not behaving in the best way we can… If we can just pay attention to that and know that when we arefeeling good we are being who we really are, the person we are born to be… then we’re doing what we’re here to do… To live our BEST life, to be the best we can be.

And by being us, by living in integrity as best we can, listening to our bodies and to how we feel, living intuitively as best we can, then we will walk towards everything we want in our lives.  It really is that simple.

It’s time to stop listening to other people and to listen to ourselves. We are the only ones that know what is best for ‘us’. No amount of books we read can tell us that. They can point us in the right direction, but we need to filter what they say through our own lens. The information in the books was true for the person who wrote it, but it doesn’t mean it’s true for you.

Its time to understand that the only things that are true for you are what feel true… You are the expert on you… Sure you’re not perfect and of course you will make mistakes finding out what IS true for you… but it’s only by trial and error, by making mistakes that you will find that out… If you stick to someone else’s rules then you will never find out who you really are… you’ll only know who you aren’t… and you won’t even know that, you’ll just ‘not feel right’ and you’ll still have that nagging feeling that there must be more to life than this.

It’s time to be brave…to climb out of the box… to do things differently…to throw away the rule books…to get to know YOU. You are perfect, amazing, wonderful, funny, brilliant… you may not know it…because it’s so long since you ever saw this version of you… But believe me you are all those things… I know it, because we all are… Remember how you were when you were a child? You knew you were all these things… It’s time to rediscover, to remember that version of you… no, to create an even better version of you… And now is the time to start…. 

       ”It’s time to be you like you’ve never been before

         It’s time to be you like only you can be

         To acknowledge your strength

         Your knowingness, your intuition

         It’s time to be YOU

         And that time is NOW!” 

If you’d like to learn more about tuning in to your intuition and living the life you were born to lead then sign up for my Newsletter. You can do that by clicking here. You’ll also get a free guided meditation “A Journey Within To Meet Your Inner Guide” plus a copy of my leaflet “10 things I wish I’d always known”.

I really appreciate your support and the fact that we’re all on the same page – in every sense of the word. Thank you!

Love Sue

5 Foods to Prevent Winter Ailments

Winter presents a number of fitness obstacles. Shorter, darker days and icy roads can freeze training in its tracks, while a storm of season-specific health problems–including cold fingers and toes, stiff, achy joints, and even seasonal depression–can leave you wanting to skip your workout altogether. Luckily, making certain foods and drinks a regular part of your diet can help you avoid common winter problems, says David Grotto, R.D., author of 101 Optimal Life Foods. So before a winter woe sidelines you, try these consumable prescriptions for staying healthy all season long.

COLD HANDS AND FEET
FOOD FIX
 The amino acid arginine helps expand blood vessels and encourages blood flow, Grotto says. Arginine is found in protein-rich foods, including hormone-free poultry,  fish, as well as cashews, almonds, and peanuts, plus cereal grains, such as oats and barley. Tea, wine, cocoa, and dark chocolate can also help: They’re rich in catechins, tannins, and other bioflavonoid compounds that help improve circulation.

STIFF, ACHY JOINTS
FOOD FIX Anti-inflammatory omega-3s, found in abundance in such fatty fish as salmon, help reduce joint inflammation and even soothe exercise-induced muscle soreness. Omega-3s are so effective that in one study nearly 60 percent of neck-and back-pain patients taking fish-oil supplements were able to stop using NSAID pain relievers like ibuprofen. Barbara Lewin, R.D., a sports nutritionist, recommends also reducing intake of omega-6 fatty acids (found in corn oil and red meat), as they can actually promote inflammation.


SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER
FOOD FIX
 Judith Wurtman, Ph.D., coauthor of The Serotonin Power Diet, explains that eating small doses of carbs (about 25 to 30 grams, or 120 calories’ worth) will help your brain produce serotonin. Consume the carbs without other foods (make sure your snack has no more than two or three grams of protein, which prevents serotonin production) and on a nearly empty stomach. Doing so will banish that SAD feeling within 20 minutes. Try an English muffin or half a bagel with jam, natural granola, pretzels, or even a a bowl or oatmeall.


THE COMMON COLD
FOOD FIX
 Vegetable soup: Research from the University of Nebraska Medical Center found that a bowl of chunky vegetable  soup has anti-inflammatory effects that ease symptoms of upper-respiratory-tract infections. The warm broth soothes throats, carrots provide beta-carotene (which is linked with immunity), and onions and garlic have antibacterial properties. Boost your stay-healthy odds with a daily cup of organic yogurt or kefir. A study published in 2008 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine revealed that long-distance runners who consumed the probiotic lactobacillus (found in yogurt and kefir) had shorter and less-severe bouts of respiratory illness than those who took a placebo.

DRY SKIN
FOOD FIX Research shows that essential fatty acids found in salmon, flaxseeds, walnuts, and olive oil can help skin cells stay hydrated. In fact, a study published in 2009 in the British Journal of Nutrition found that participants who took flaxseed-or borage-oil supplements for three months had a significant increase in skin moisture and a reduction in roughness. Grotto also encourages people to get plenty of ACES–his acronym for vitamins A, C, E, and selenium. “They’re all antioxidants that help heal our skin from the inside out.”

If you’re on facebook please stop by our new facebookpage and “like” us. We have daily affirmations and inspirational quotes along with “water checks”and Random Acts of Kindness reminders.http://www.facebook.com/celestial.healing

www.healingpowerhour.com

10 Ways To Deal With Negative or Difficult People

by Lori Deschene

I love her to death, but it’s draining to talk to her.

Every time I call this friend of mine, I know what I’m in for: a half-hour rant about everything that’s difficult, miserable or unfair.

Sometimes she focuses on the people she feels have wronged her and other times she explores the general hopelessness of life. She never calls to see how I’m doing, and she rarely listens to what’s going on in my life for more than a minute before shifting the focus back to herself.

I tell myself I call because I care, but sometimes I wonder if I have ulterior motives–to pump up my ego offering good advice, or even to feel better about my own reality.

I’m no saint, and if there’s one thing I know well, we only do things repeatedly if we believe there’s something in it for us. Even if that something is just to feel needed.

I thought about this the other day when a reader wrote to me with an interesting question: “How do you offer compassion to someone who doesn’t seem to deserve it?”

While I believe everyone deserves compassion, I understand what we meant after reading more. She went on to describe her offensive, sexist, racist boss who emotionally exhausts everyone around him. He sounds a lot more hateful than my friend, who is, sadly, just terribly depressed.

But these people have one thing in common: boundless negative energy that ends up affecting everyone around them.

So today I started thinking about how we interact with negative or difficult people. People who seem chronically critical, belligerent, indignant, angry, or just plain rude.

When someone repeatedly drains everyone around them, how do you maintain a sense of compassion without getting sucked into their doom? And how do you act in a way that doesn’t reinforce their negativity–and maybe even helps them?

Here’s what I’ve come up with:

1. Resist the urge to judge or assume.

It’s hard to offer someone compassion when you assume you have them pegged. He’s a jerk. She’s a malcontent. He’s an–insert other choice noun. Even if it seems unlikely someone will wake up one day and act differently we have to remember it is possible.

When you think negative thoughts, it comes out in your body language. Someone prone to negativity may feel all too tempted to mirror that. Try coming at them with the positive mindset you wish they had. Expect the best in them. You never know when you might be pleasantly surprised.

2. Dig deeper, but stay out of the hole.

It’s always easier to offer someone compassion if you try to understand where they’re coming from. But that can’t completely justify bad behavior. If you show negative people you support their choice to behave badly, you give them no real incentive to make a change (which they may actually want deep down).

It may help to repeat this in your head when you deal with them: “I understand your pain. But I’m most helpful if I don’t feed into it.” This might help you approach them with both kindness and firmness so they don’t bring you down with them.

3. Maintain a positive boundary.

Some people might tell you to visualize a bright white light around you to maintain a positive space when other people enter it with negativity. This doesn’t actually work for me because I respond better to ideas in words than visualizations. So I tell myself this, “I can only control the positive space I create around myself.”

Then when I interact with this person, I try to do two things, in this order of importance:

  • Protect the positive space around me. When their negativity is too strong to protect it, I need to walk away.
  • Help them feel more positive, not act more positive–which is more likely to create the desired result.

4. Disarm their negativity, even if just for now.

This goes back to the ideas I mentioned above. I know my depressed friend will rant about life’s injustices as long as I let her. Part of me feels tempted to play amateur psychiatrist–get her talking, and then try to help her reframe situations into a more positive light.

Then I remind myself I can’t change her whole way of being in one phone call. She has to want that. I also can’t listen for hours on end, as I’ve done in the past. But I can listen compassionately for a short while and then help her focus on something positive right now, in this moment. I can ask about her upcoming birthday. I can remind her it’s a beautiful day for a walk. Don’t try to solve or fix them. Just aim to help them now.

5. Temper your emotional response.

Negative people often gravitate toward others who react strongly–people who easily offer compassionate or get outraged, or offended. I suspect this gives them a little light in the darkness of their inner world–a sense that they’re not floating alone in their own anger or sadness.

People remember and learn from what you do more than what you say. If you feed into the situation with emotions, you’ll teach them they can depend on you for a reaction. It’s tough not to react because we’re human, but it’s worth practicing.

Once you’ve offered a compassionate ear for as long as you can, respond as calmly as possible with a simple line of fact. If you’re dealing with a rude or angry person, you may want to change the subject to something unrelated: “Dancing with the Stars is on tonight. Planning to watch it?”

6. Question what you’re getting out of it.

Like I mentioned above, we often get something out of relationships with negative people. Get real honest with yourself: have you fallen into a caretaker role because it makes you feel needed? Have you maintained the relationship so you can gossip about this person in a holier-than-thou way with others? Do you have some sort of stake in keeping the things the way they are?

Questioning yourself helps you change the way you respond–which is really all you can control. You can’t make someone think, feel, or act differently. You can be as kind as possible or as combative as possible, and still not change reality for someone else. All you can control is whatyou think and do–and then do your best to help them without hurting yourself.

7. Remember the numbers.

Research shows that people with negative attitudes have significantly higher rates of stress and disease. Someone’s mental state plays a huge role in their physical health. If someone’s making life difficult for people around them, you can be sure they’re doing worse for themselves.

What a sad reality. That someone has so much pain inside them they have to act out just to feel some sense of relief–even if that relief comes from getting a rise out of people. When you remember how much a difficult person is suffering, it’s easier to stay focused on minimizing negativity, as opposed to defending yourself.

8. Don’t take it personally–but know sometimes it is personal.

Conventional wisdom suggests that you should never take things personally when you deal with a negative person. I think it’s a little more complicated than that. You can’t write off everything someone says about you just because the person is insensitive or tactless. Even an abrasive person may have a valid point. Try to weigh their comments with a willingness to learn.

Accept that you don’t deserve the excessive emotions in someone’s tone, but weigh their ideas with a willingness to learn. Some of the most useful lessons I’ve learned came from people I wished weren’t right.

9. Act instead of just reacting.

Oftentimes we wait until someone gets angry or depressed before we try to buoy their spirits. If you know someone who seems to deal with difficult thoughts or feelings often (as demonstrated in their behavior) don’t wait for a situation to help them create positive feelings.

Give them a compliment for something they did well. Remind them of a moment when they were happy–as in “Remember when you scored that touchdown during the company picnic? That was awesome!” You’re more apt to want to boost them up when they haven’t brought you down. This may help mitigate that later, and also give them a little relief from their pain.

10. Maintain the right relationship based on reality as it is.

With my friend, I’m always wishing she could be more positive. I consistently put myself in situations where I feel bad because I want to help, because I want her to be happy. I’ve recently realized the best I can do is accept her as she is, let her know I believe in her ability to be happy, and then give her space to make the choice.

That means gently bringing our conversation to a close after I’ve made an effort to help. Or cutting short a night out if I’ve done all I can and it’s draining me. Hopefully she’ll want to change some day. Until then, all I can do is love her, while loving myself enough to take care of my needs. Which often means putting them first.

I’ve learned you can’t always saved the world. But you can make the world a better place by working on yourself–by becoming self-aware, tapping into your compassion, and protecting your positive space. You may even help negative people by fostering a sense of peace within yourself that their negativity can’t pierce.

www.healingpowerhour.com