Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: management

Love Study: Brain Reacts To Heartbreak Same As Physical Pain

Love hurts, and that is not just a saying for the broken hearted. Heartbreak is a very strange distress. It is exquisitely painful, and yet we cannot find an injury on our body. New research finds that when you reminisce about the one that got away, the brain actually triggers sensations that you also feel in times of “real” physical pain, making heartbreak truly, physically painful to add to the emotional distress it sometimes causes.

Heartbreak is like one big emotional pain but it also seems to spark off hundreds of other emotions. We hate the feeling of heartbreak, and yet we find ourselves compelled to go over and over memories, ideas or fantasies which make the feeling worse.

Edward E. Smith, director of cognitive neuroscience at Columbia University explains:

“This tells us how serious rejection can be sometimes. When people are saying ‘I really feel in pain about this breakup,’ you don’t want to trivialize it and dismiss it by saying ‘It’s all in your mind.’ Our ultimate goal is to see what kind of therapeutic approach might be useful in relieving the pain of rejection. From everyday experience, rejection seems to be one of the most painful things we experience. It seems the feelings of rejection can be sustained even longer than being angry.”

Forty people analyzed from New York City and all of whom felt “intensely rejected,” took part in the study. While participants were told to look at photos, including photos of their friends (they were directed to think positive thoughts about them), and photos of their exes (they were directed to think about their breakup), their brains were scanned for changes in activity. The participants also underwent brain scans as they felt pain on their forearms similar to the feeling of holding a hot cup of coffee in comparison. Several of the same areas of the brain became active when the participants felt either physical pain or emotional pain.

The research shows that rejection appears to be in a class by itself in terms of its similarity to physical pain. Future research could examine how emotional pain due to rejection affects how people feel physical pain.

Here are some tips that may help you get over the pain:

  • Breathe. All you can do is survive this first and difficult day. Take one day at a time. Give yourself permission to mourn. Call in sick at work, sleep all day, eat too much ice cream, sob.
  • Congratulate yourself for being human: It is only when you open yourself to love that your heart can break. Develop and repeat a helpful mantra to get you through the initial shock and pain, such as “This too shall pass” or “I will survive.”
  • Reach out to a close friend or family member. It helps to share your thoughts with others. Watch a movie to distract yourself. Choose a comedy that has cheered you up in the past. Or watch a movie that’s guaranteed to make you sob–it may surprise you how good that feels.
  • Surround yourself with friends. This may mean reaching out to people you fell out of touch with during the relationship. Make lists to help you regain your confidence and identity: a list of your friends, of things you like, of what you want to accomplish in the next decade. Spoil yourself: Get a new hairstyle, have a spa day or go shopping. Resist the urge to call your ex.
  • Assess the experience. Have you learned anything about yourself? Does the experience make you more empathetic to others who’ve suffered a hardship? Begin an activity that will fill your time, distract your mind and rebuild your confidence. Train for a marathon, take up yoga or learn a new language. Resist the urge to call your ex. Volunteer your time at a local homeless shelter, soup kitchen or tutoring center. It will take your mind off your own woes and keep your suffering in perspective.
  • Force yourself to go on dates. You’ll be surprised to discover that your heart can still flutter over someone. It’s part of the healing process.
  • Consult a psychiatrist if you are experiencing symptoms of depression, such as lack of appetite, insomnia or too much sleeping, low self-esteem, and an inability to concentrate or carry out routine tasks. Ask a friend or physician to recommend one who is experienced in treating depression.
  • Remember that healing is a process that takes time. Expect waves of sadness, anger, guilt or fear even after you think you are over it. Give your heart time to heal.
  • Compartmentalize the experience in your memory: “My heart was broken once. It really hurt and I’m glad it’s over.”

As one popular quote goes, “Love is like falling down… in the end you’re left hurt, scarred, and with a memory of it forever.”

www.healingpowerhour.com

The 8 Time Slots When You’re Naturally At Your Best

It’s not just your energy level or weight that fluctuates over the course of a day. Did you know that your brain obeys its own rhythm too? It’s based largely on your human clock, sleep pattern, exposure to light, and genetic makeup—and getting in a groove with its tempo can make you healthier, happier, and have more energy.

As cutting-edge research shows, you can burn more calories from exercise, work more efficiently and improve concentration, and even have better sex by learning how to synch up to your circadian rhythm and brain’s power hours. Here’s your daily guide.

7 to 9 AM: Best for Passion

“The perfect moment for bonding with your spouse is right when you wake up,” says Ilia Karatsoreos, PhD, a neuroscientist at Rockefeller University. The reason: Levels of oxytocin (aka the “love hormone”) are sky-high upon waking, making it the best time for intimacy of all kinds.

These are the hours to strengthen your relationship with the most important people in your life. Wake up feeling frisky and need more than just cuddling? Your husband’s brain is on nearly the same wavelength; British researchers found high morning oxytocin levels in men gradually decreased as the day wore on.

Tap into it: Make love or cuddle. Tell your partner how much you love him. Call your child at college (so long as it’s not the weekend!). Pen a thank-you note to a friend.

9 to 11 AM: Best for Creativity

Your brain now has moderate levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which in reasonable amounts can actually help your mind focus, says Sung Lee, MD, secretary of the International Brain Education Association. It’s present at any age: A University of Michigan study found that college students and retired adults were both mentally quick in the morning—but among older subjects, sharpness declined in the afternoon.

Because you’re primed for learning, take on tasks that require analysis and concentration. “From middle age on, you’re more alert early in the day,” says Carolyn Yoon, PhD, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Michigan who worked on the study. Schedule discussions that involve personal or family matters, as others will be sharp during these hours as well.

Tap into it: Develop a new idea. Write a presentation. Brainstorm solutions to challenges, large or small. Have an important convo with your doctor.

11 AM to 2 PM: Best for Tough Tasks

By now, levels of the sleep hormone melatonin have dipped sharply from their late evening and early morning peaks. This means you’re more ready to take on a load of projects, according to German researchers. They found that reaction time and the ability to accomplish several to-dos were strong in the middle of the day.

Tear through that list—because of your mental quickness, this time of day is best for taking action. One tip: Cross items off one at a time, says René Marois, PhD, director of the Human Information Processing Laboratory at Vanderbilt University. Attempts to juggle tasks simultaneously put additional demands on your brain, making you more likely to lose concentration and make slip-ups.

Tap into it: Plow through voice mails or e-mails. Give a presentation to a client or boss. Iron out a tough problem with your spouse.

2 to 3 PM: Best for a Break

To digest your lunch, your body draws blood away from your brain to your stomach, says Lee. Aim to eat lunch closer to 2 PM, as the midday meal can make you wish there was a couch to crash on close by. Your body’s circadian rhythm (the biological “clock” that regulates sleep and wakefulness) is also in a brief down phase during this time, according to a Harvard study.

Steer clear of your workload and play around on Facebook or flip through magazines. If you’re at work and need to fight off drowsiness, take a quick, brisk walk around the block or drink some water—both will get blood moving away from your belly and toward your head. “Water increases vascular volume and circulation, promoting blood flow to your brain,” he says.

Tap into it: Meditate or pray. Read for pleasure—Web sites, magazines, or newspapers. Go for a stroll.

3 to 6 PM: Best for Collaboration

“The brain is pretty fatigued by now,” says Paul Nussbaum, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist and author of Your Brain Health Lifestyle. That doesn’t mean you’re stressed, however: University of Michigan scientists found that cortisol levels usually decline in women by late afternoon.

Although your brain is not as sharp as earlier, you’re more easygoing, so plan a low-pressure meeting for now. If you’ve already left work, pick an activity that is as different from your job as possible, suggests Nussbaum. Exercise is a perfect one: Studies show that grip strength, manual dexterity, and other physical skills are at their strongest by evening, but if you work out too late, the residual adrenaline may interfere with sleep for some people. A gym session right before dinner solves the problem.

Tap into it: Brainstorm with coworkers. Strength-train.

6 to 8 PM: Best for Personal Tasks

Between these hours, researchers have found that the brain enters something called “wake maintenance,” when its production of sleep-friendly melatonin is at an all-day low. As a result, chances of getting tired now are next to none. Studies also show that your tastebuds are lit up during these hours because of circadian variations in hormone levels.

Keep your energy up by exposing yourself to the last of the day’s serotonin-stimulating sunlight. Now may be a good time to walk the dog or walk yourself to the grocery store. And because you’re now more alert but no longer at work, direct your renewed burst of mental energy toward your husband and kids and maybe some friends; you’re bound to be pretty engaging about now.

Tap into it: Run errands. Clean a long-overdue room in your house. Enjoy quality time with your family members. Whip up a delicious meal.

8 to 10 PM: Best for Relaxing

There’s an abrupt transition from being wide awake to feeling sleepy as melatonin levels rise quickly, report Australian and British researchers. Meanwhile, levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter tied to perkiness, start to fade. “Eighty percent of serotonin is stimulated from exposure to daylight, so now you’re slowing down,” says Rubin Naiman, PhD, sleep specialist and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine.

Now’s the time to ease into relaxing, “mindless” activities (save the crossword puzzle for the morning). “By nightfall, when your brain is tired, this is a good way to bring yourself down, like walking a lap or two after a big workout,” says Naiman.

Tap into it: Unwind by watching a funny movie. Try a low-key, repetitive activity, such as knitting.

10 PM onward: Best for Snoozing

Your brain is looking to knit together all it learned today, which it does during sleep. Your top priority should be getting a full night’s rest. Sleep can inspire insight: In one study, more than half of those taught a task thought of an easier way to do it after 8 hours of sleep. Adjusting lighting can help: Dim the rooms you occupy after dinner to let your body know the day is ending, suggests Naiman. In a few hours, your brain will be ready to start all over again.

Whatever helps you get to sleep—and it may take adjustments over time—follow your routine consistently. Just make sure you sign off early enough so you get the 7 to 9 hours of shut-eye recommended for optimal health and energy.

Tap into it: Curl up with a good book. Write in your journal. Drift off while reading something you want to remember in the morning.

.

.

www.healingpowerhour.com