Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

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Sea Salt vs. Table Salt – Which is better?

There are some differences between the two kinds of salts; while their chemical makeups are the same, both of them consist of two main minerals: sodium and chloride.

But ocean salt has different taste and texture from table salt. It is processed differently and very lightly, and normally is produced through evaporating seawater. This is the very reason why it has different flavor, texture and color. It usually has a small amount of minerals from the water source depending on its location. Iodine is one of its natural ingredients.

All ocean salts are not created equal too! Most coastal countries produce ocean salt which flavors and colors vary from one another. They are all known as gourmet salts, preferred over table salts by many.

In comparison, table salt is more heavily processed, eliminating other mineral traces. It’s also added food additive to prevent it from becoming clump, which is damaging to our health.

Healthy sodium consumption should be 1,500- 2,300 mg a day.

If you have high blood pressure, or have reached middle-age, aim for the lower end of this sodium consumption range. Though ocean salt is more natural, less sodium and has other minerals, too much of it is not good either.

And don’t confuse salt from sea with salt from Dead Sea.

More on Sea Salt

Sea salt contains less sodium than standard table salt so this is helpful to individuals suffering from hypertension.  Sea salt is a broad term that generally refers to unrefined salt derived directly from a living ocean or sea. It is harvested through channeling ocean water into large clay trays and allowing the sun and wind to evaporate it naturally. Manufacturers of sea salt typically do not refine sea salt as much as other kinds of processed salt, so it still contains natural traces of other minerals, including iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, manganese, zinc and iodine. Proponents of sea salt rave about its bright, pure, clean flavor, and about the subtleties lent to it by these other trace minerals. Some of the most common sources for sea salt include the Mediterranean Sea, the North Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean (particularly in France, on the coast of Brittany). Sea salt is healthier and more flavorful than traditional table salt. It’s available in coarse, fine & extra fine grain size, and many sizes in between!

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10 Foods that Lower Cholesterol

LDL and HDL The bad and The Good Cholesterol

1. Whole grains and oats – a five-year Insulin Resistance Athersclerosis Study showed that people whose diets contain the most whole grains “had the thinnest carotid artery walls and showed the slowest progression in artery wall thickness.”

2. Blueberries – a compound in blueberries (pterostilbene) may help lower cholesterol as effectively as commercial drugs with fewer side effects.

Walnuts lower HDL Levels 3. Nuts – I recommend Pistachios, Walnuts, and Almonds – a Penn State study showed that eating pistachios significantly lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol levels. Research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology showed eating walnuts or almonds after a high-fat meal might protect your heart. Omega-3 fats and antioxidants in nuts work to reverse the arterial damage caused by saturated fats.

4. Avocados, 5. Olives, and Olive oil – 26 of the 30 grams of fat in an avocado are heart-healthy, unsaturated fats that can increase your levels of HDL cholesterol. The good fats in avocados, olives, and olive oil protect against heart disease and diabetes. Check out the Mediterranean Diet.

6. Flaxseed oil – flaxseed oil can lower blood pressure in men with high cholesterol. In a three-month study of 59 middle-aged men, those who took daily flaxseed oil supplements (with eight grams of the omega-3 fats, alpha-linoleic acid) experienced significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

7. 100% cranberry-grape juice – antioxidants in grape juice slow down LDL cholesterol oxidation, and cranberry juice raises HDL or “good” cholesterol.

8. Fish and Fish oil – a study from the Norwegian University of ScienceSalmon Oil to Lower Cholesterol and Technology found that people with type 2 diabetes who consumed high doses of fish oil over nine weeks lowered the size and concentration of several lipoprotein subclasses (cholesterol) in their bodies.

9. Pomegranate juice – a National Academy of Sciences study showed that pomegranate juice reduces cholesterol plaque buildup and increases nitric oxide production (nitric oxide helps reduce arterial plaque).

10. Yogurt with live active cultures (probiotics) – Vicki Koenig, MS, RD, CDN said “several studies have shown that the probiotics Lactobacillus Acidophilus and Lactobacillus Reuteri actually help lower cholesterol. They work by preventing the reabsorption of cholesterol back in to the blood stream.”

You might be a person who is predisposed to high cholesterol, or maybe your diet could use a shape-up. Here are a few key points on cholesterol that I try to focus on:

LDL or “bad” cholesterol deposits itself on the walls of your arteries, forming plaques that make them hard and narrow. HDL or “good” cholesterol removes excess LDL in your blood and brings it to your liver for disposal. The more HDL you consume, the less LDL you’ll have in your blood.

You may need natural herbs to help reduce your cholesterol, but eating a heart-healthy diet and getting exercise are very important. To find out what type of herbs you need to help reduce your cholesterol please check our website By Clicking Here or contact Dr Akilah for a private consultation.

10 Foods All Diabetics Should Eat

If you or a loved one receives a diagnosis of diabetes, this is nothing less than a complete life change. Diabetics must be mindful of their blood sugar levels to keep their disease in check. One of the most important parts of doing so is watching what you eat. You want to ensure that you are getting your fruits and vegetables, along with plenty of lean protein. Some foods can be added to your diet to help keep diabetes under control – keep reading to see ten foods which can be helpful to diabetics.

Delicious Veggies

1. Vegetables. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes, corn, and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables.

Fruit is great for Diabetics

2. Fruit. Packed with almost all the same advantages as vegetables fruit is brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s lower in calories than most other foods. Best of all, fruit is loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart.

Because fruit has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, you can’t eat it with utter abandon. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Choose whole produce over juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber are found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit, so they’re lost during juicing, and more of the calories and sugar remain.

3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source of dietary fiber, which not only makes you feel full longer, it actually slows digestion and keeps blood sugar from spiking after a meal. This effect is so powerful that it can even lower your overall blood sugar levels.

Throw canned beans into every salad you make (rinse them first), and add them to pasta and chili. Black bean, split pea, or lentil soup is an excellent lunch, even if it comes from a can.

4. Cereal. The right breakfast cereal is your absolute best opportunity to pack more fiber into your day. There’s a bonus: Studies show that people who start the morning with a high-fiber cereal actually eat less later on. So don’t forgo breakfast. Better yet, choose a cereal with at least 5 grams fiber per serving. Good choices include Kashi GoLean Crunch! (10 grams), Kellogg’s Raisin Bran (8 grams), General Mills Multi-Bran Chex (8 grams), Post Wheat ‘N Bran Spoon Size (8 grams), Kellogg’s All-Bran Original (10 grams) and General Mills Fiber One (14 grams). Top your cereal with fruit and you’ve checked off a fruit serving for the day.

5. Fish. Fast and easy to prepare, fish is a good source of protein, and a great substitute for higher-fat meats. Also, fatty fish is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids, those remarkable good-for-you fats that help keep the arteries clear. People with diabetes often have high triglycerides and low levels of HDL, the ‘good’ cholesterol. Omega-3 fatty acids can improve both numbers. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week. Excellent sources of omega-3s are salmon, mackerel, and tuna.

Hormone Free Chicken Breast

6. Poultry breast. Versatile, extremely lean, and low in calories, chicken breast is practically a miracle food. Unlike steaks and hamburgers, it’s low in saturated fat, which raises ‘bad’ cholesterol and may increase insulin resistance, making blood sugar control more difficult. A 3-ounce serving of skinless chicken breast has only 142 calories and 3 grams fat. Turkey breast is even leaner and lower in calories.

Almonds high in Omega 3

7. Nuts. Nuts have several things going for them — and for you. They’re loaded with ‘good’ fats that fight heart disease. These fats have even been shown to help reduce insulin resistance and make blood sugar easier to control. Nuts are also one of the best food sources of vitamin E, an antioxidant that protects cells and may help prevent nerve and eye damage. They are rich in fiber and magnesium, both of which may help regulate your blood sugar. Studies suggest that including them in your diet may even help you lose weight — if you eat them in moderation. Don’t forget that they’re high in calories.

8. Olive oil. At the center of the famously heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is olive oil is considered a ‘good’ fat that helps slash the risk of heart attack — and has been shown to help keep blood sugar steady by reducing insulin resistance. So toss the butter and cook with olive oil instead. At home and in restaurants, dip your bread in a bit of the stuff. Just watch how much you eat, because at 119 calories per tablespoon, even ‘good’ fat can pack on the pounds.

9. Yogurt. Yogurt is rich in protein and another weight loss powerhouse: calcium. Several studies have shown that people who eat plenty of calcium-rich foods have an easier time losing weight — and are less likely to become insulin resistant. As a snack or for breakfast, choose nonfat plain yogurt, and add your own fresh fruit or a sprinkling of wheat germ or low-fat granola for a burst of extra nutrients.

Cinnamon for diabetes

10. Cinnamon. Believe it! Amazingly, just by sprinkling cinnamon on your foods, you could lower your blood sugar. Components in cinnamon help the body use insulin more efficiently, so more glucose can enter cells. A recent study found that in people with diabetes, just 1/2 teaspoon a day can significantly lower blood sugar levels. So go ahead and add powdered cinnamon to your whole wheat toast, oatmeal, baked apples, or even chicken dishes. Or soak a cinnamon stick in hot water to make a soothing and curative cup of cinnamon tea.

To learn how to cure diabetes naturally please contact Dr Akilah El  by calling our wellness center at 770-603-0141

For more healthy food ideas and information please visit our Health Tips Pagehttp://www.celestialhealing.net/healthintro..htm