Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: eyes

7 Natural Remedies for Seasonal Allergies

With spring starting, allergy sufferers are dreading the onset of allergy season. Perhaps you are like so many patients for whom the typical allergy medications don’t work that well.

For those of you who think you may have run out of options, there are powerful natural alternatives that can help prepare your body in advance to prevent allergy symptoms and treat them if you already are suffering.

Seven natural remedies for seasonal allergies:

1. Begin with a non-allergenic diet: Although allergens are external, it is actually our body’s response to them that is the cause of the allergy — it is an allergic reaction. If your body is already inundated with food allergy triggers, your immune system will be hyper-wired to react to external allergens. Eliminate wheat, dairy, and excess sugar, the most common allergens.

2. Try a spoonful of honey: Choose local raw unfiltered honey produced by bees that live in your area. The theory is that consuming honey may be much like immunotherapy, in the same way that allergists introduce tiny doses of an allergen to reduce sensitivity. As bees collect nectar from flowers, they inadvertently pick up pollen grains, which get into the honey, creating homeopathic immunotherapy.

Using honey as a preventive works best with a daily dose several weeks or months before allergy season. For example, New York City recently approved beekeeping, and one brand, called Hi-Rise Hive, is sold at local health food stores.

3. Take vitamin C and quercetin: Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and also a mast cell “stabilizer.” Mast cells are tiny cells that line the mucous membranes, which when exposed to an allergen, release histamine.

Histamine in the bloodstream is the cause of symptoms such as, eye irritation, sneezing, and a runny nose. Vitamin C makes mast cells less reactive, thus reducing allergy symptom, and quercetin is a powerful flavonoid that enhances the effects of vitamin C.

Take 1500mg of vitamin C with 500mg quercetin at the first signs of allergies and repeat every four to six hours as needed. This crafty combination can put a sneezing attack to rest within 20 to 30 minutes. Another great product, Natural D-Hist also contains singing nettle leaf, bromelein (an enzyme), and N-acetyl cysteine (thins mucous).

4. Drink stinging nettle leaf tea: If you have come in contact with this perennial, you probably remember the sting. But it’s safe and healthy in drink form. Steep the tea for 10 to 15 minutes to obtain the full benefits of the medicinal oils.

5. Sooth your nose with a neti pot: Seasonal allergies are usually due to pollen from flowering plants, grasses, and trees that become stuck in the nasal passages. Pollen triggers the inflammatory process that we call allergies. One way to reduce symptoms is to wash the allergens out with salt-water.

Neti pots have been used since ancient India to clear nasal passages. Using a neti pot or a saline nasal rinse is a great way to help reduce allergy symptoms.

6. Inhale steam with essential oils: Bring water to a boil in a saucepan and then turn off the heat. Place 4 drops eucalyptus oil, 1 to 2 drops tea tree oil, and 3 drops rosemary essential oil. Drape a large towel over your head and inhale deeply for 5 to 10 minutes.

7. Give acupuncture a shot: Acupuncture can be effective, and it is thought that acupuncture may temper an overactive immune system. Applied locally, it can help reduce nasal and sinus inflammation that is the cause of much of the discomfort from allergies

 .

Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter 

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

6 Deadly Dangers of Hot Tubs

As over hundreds of guests recently learned after a dip in the Playboy Mansion’s hot tub, there’s nothing viruses and bacteria love more than warm H2O.

By Korin Miller

.
If the idea of a long soak in a steaming hot tub conjures up sigh-inducing images of relaxation and romance, we’re about to, uh, burst your bubble. “People don’t realize it, but a hot tub can be a breeding ground for infections ranging from skin issues to STDs,” says New York internist Holly Phillips. Don’t submerge your bod into one this summer until you read this.

Bugged Out

Yes, hot tubs are chlorinated, but if they aren’t properly maintained, the chemicals won’t kill off all the teeming bacteria that love to call them home. The heat doesn’t fry them either, says hot-tub expert Brenda Murr, member of the American Pool and Spa Professionals retail council. “Bacteria grow even faster in warm water,” she says.

The most common side effect of soaking is pseudomonas folliculitis, a skin infection that produces itchy, bright red bumps. It usually clears up on its own in 10 days or less—a good thing considering that it’s resistant to many antibiotics, according to Albert Lefkovits, a dermatologist in New York City.

Then there are the bacteria that cause toxic shock syndrome (the life-threatening infection tampon boxes warn about). They can get in a tub if another person who has soaked before you carries them and enter your body through a small cut or scrape. Getting toxic shock syndrome from a tub is rare, says Dr. Phillips, but it does happen.

Other possible perils include heat stroke and heat exhaustion from being in one too long (just 10 to 15 minutes is recommended), says Lara McKenzie, PhD. Add alcohol and you’re at greater risk of both, as the warm water gets you tipsy and dehydrated more quickly.

You can even become seriously injured from getting your hair caught in a drain. In a 2009 study on hot-tub injuries, 49 such cases— some of them fatal—were found over a 16-year period.

New legislation was passed in 2007 that requires all public tubs (not just new ones) to have safer drain covers installed that greatly reduce the likelihood that your mane will become entangled, but it’s hard to enforce.

Proximity Effect

There are more unexpected danger zones. Bacteria can live in a tub’s pipes, says Dr. Phillips, and when the jets turn on, air bubbles rise to the surface, burst, and shoot bacteria into the air. Breathing in the bugs can lead to anything from a bad cough to Legionnaires’ disease, a rare but potentially deadly form of pneumonia. (This was the same bacteria that was found in the Playboy Mansion tub earlier this week, leaving 123 people sick).

Think you’d be safe as long as you just sit and watch from the sidelines? Nope. If someone with herpes recently sat on the edge and you take their place, you possibly could contract the virus, even through a bathing suit, says Dr. Lefkovits. The risks are lower than if you’d had unprotected sex, but consider this: Roughly 1 in 6 people from ages 14 to 49 has genital herpes, and the virus loves to live in warm, damp areas like, yes, the rim of a hot tub.

Safer Soaking

You don’t have to swear off hot tubs forever. Just steer clear of high-traffic tubs, like the ones at hotels, gyms, and spas. “The more people in a tub, the higher your risk for getting sick,” says Dr. Phillips. Even in a friend’s hot tub, don’t dunk your head underwater or (sorry) get busy. Both ramp up the odds of infection.

Addicted to being massaged all over by those hot-water jets? Maybe it’s time to invest in your own Jacuzzi bathtub.

As Seen on TV

We know you wouldn’t fall for rumors like these, but we have to set the record straight on a couple of ridiculous claims we saw on our favorite shows.

The Heat Kills Sperm Instantly (Jersey Shore)

Nope—the temperatures aren’t high enough. You can still get pregnant if you have intercourse in a tub without protection.

Sperm can swim from one person to the next. (Glee)

Sperm can’t survive for more than a few seconds in hot, chlorinated water.

.

.

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

Vitamin D May Help Prevent Vision Loss in Women

Eating fresh water fish or drinking a tall glass of soymilk daily could cut your risk for vision loss later in life. According to a new study led by Amy Millen, Ph.D., of the University at Buffalo in New York, maintaining an adequate level of vitamin D can significantly reduce the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in women. The details of the study were recently published in the medical journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

AMD is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness among Americans aged 65 and older. The condition is caused by degeneration of the macula (the part of the retina responsible for the precise, central vision necessary for such activities as reading and driving) that leads to central vision loss. It is estimated that about 1.75 million Americans currently suffer from advanced AMD, and that the number of people diagnosed with the condition will reach nearly 3 million by 2020.

For their study, Millen and her colleagues examined data from the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), a part of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study in which the women were screened for the levels of vitamin D in their bodies. Vitamin D status was assessed using the blood measure of 25-hydroxyvitamin D or 25 (OH) D. This level is generally considered the means by which nutritional vitamin D status is defined. The analysis included data on 1,313 women ages 50 to 79.

Findings showed that among women aged 50 to 74 an increased intake of vitamin D from foods and supplements combined was associated with 59 percent decrease in the likelihood of developing early age-related macular degeneration. Overall, 241 of the women developed early AMD, while 26 developed advanced disease.

A strong note of interest is that the results of the study revealed that it was not exposure to the sunlight that decreased the risk of AMD, but food sources rich in vitamin D such as milk, fish, omega 3 fish oils, fortified cereals, fortified margarine, and other dairy products. In addition, the researchers found that the lowest risk of AMD was observed among women who consumed 720 international units (IU) of Vitamin D per day, which exceeds the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation for an intake of 600 IU daily.

The study findings confirm the link between high vitamin D concentrations and early AMD found in a previous analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). However, further investigation into the effects of genetics and lifestyle factors on the study results are warranted. The authors acknowledged, “More studies are needed to verify this association prospectively as well as to better understand the potential interaction between vitamin D status and genetic and lifestyle factors with respect to risk of early age-related macular degeneration.”

.

.

For more healthy food ideas, recipes and information please visit our Health Tips Pagehttp://www.celestialhealing.net/healthintro..htm

How To Prevent Sugar From Aging Your Skin

Too much sugar packs on pounds, as we all know, but did you know it can also cause wrinkles?

At blame is glycation, a natural process in which the sugar in your bloodstream attaches to proteins to form harmful new molecules called advanced glycation end products (or, appropriately, AGEs for short). The more sugar you eat, the more AGEs you develop, according to  Fredric Brandt, MD, a dermatologist in private practice in Miami and New York City and author of 10 Minutes 10 Years.  The good news about sugar-damaged skin: It’s never too late to turn back the clock. Here, five steps to start following today:

1. Limit sneaky sweeteners. It’s not easy to eliminate sugar completely. Even whole grains, fruits, and vegetables turn to glucose—the type of sugar that fuels glycation—when digested. But limiting added sugar can help. Some guidelines: Keep added sugar to no more than 10% of total calories. Many prepared foods contain hefty amounts of sugar hidden under ingredient-list aliases like barley malt, corn syrup, dextrose, fruit juice concentrate, maltose, maple syrup, molasses, and turbinado. And avoid high fructose corn syrup, which is believed to produce more AGEs than other types of sweetener.

2. Take 1 mg of vitamins B1 and B6 a day. These vitamins proved to be potent AGE inhibitors in a number of published studies, says David J. Goldberg, MD, a New York City–based dermatologist and a clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. B1 and B6 are plentiful in food, but taking a multivitamin–most of which deliver at least 1 mg of both Bs–ensures you’re getting the daily value of 1.1 mg for B1 and 1.3 mg for B6 (1.5 mg after age 50).

3. Slather on broad-spectrum SPF 30 sunscreen (even when it’s cloudy). Significantly more AGEs occur in sun-exposed skin than in protected skin, according to a British Journal of Dermatology study. And those pesky rays poke through clouds, so make it a ritual.

4. Wear and eat your antioxidants. These free-radical fighters help keep sugar from attaching to proteins, so replenishing their supply is a real skin saver. Do so by eating more antioxidant-rich fruits, nuts, and vegetables, such as cranberries, walnuts, and red bell peppers, and by applying topical antioxidants, such as green tea and vitamins C and E.

5. Try new ingredients that protect skin from sugar. A growing number of products contain compounds like aminoguanidine (say that 5 times fast) and alistin, which may block the formation of AGEs. “These compounds attach to molecules that start the glycation process and prevent them from binding to collagen and elastin,” explains Karyn Grossman, MD, chief of the division of dermatology at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, CA. In a study on Prescriptives Anti-AGE Advanced Protection Lotion SPF 25, which contains both ingredients, skin treated with the product had 21% fewer AGEs after 8 weeks than untreated skin. Sweet!

.

.

To read more about anti-aging methods please visit Our Websitewww.HealingPowerHour.com