Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: carbs

5 Foods That’ll Make You Look Younger

The key to glowing skin lies in your stomach.

1. Sweet Potatoes

Beta-carotene, which makes these tubers orange, balances your skin’s pH, helps combat dryness, and promotes cell turnover, all resulting in smoother skin.

2. Wild Salmon

The pigment that makes the fish pink, astaxanthin, is a powerful foe of free radicals, rogue molecules that damage cell membranes and DNA and cause skin to age. A study found that eating one serving every five days can prevent actinic keratoses—ugly rough patches that are precancerous.

3. Tomatoes

The fruit’s red pigment, lycopene, is a potent antioxidant that shields skin from sun damage—like sunscreen, but from the inside out. To best absorb lycopene, eat tomatoes with olive oil.

4. Citrus Fruits

Vitamin C is essential to building collagen, a vital component of young-looking skin, which starts breaking down in your twenties. Citrus also contains bioflavonoids, which protect skin from UV rays and help prevent cell death.

5. Leafy Greens

Spinach, kale, and other greens contain lutein, which protects skin from sun-induced inflammation and wrinkles.

Stay Away From White Foods

Need another reason to avoid white bread, pasta, rice, and other refined grain products? They’re quickly broken down into the ultimate white food: sugar. Once in the bloodstream, sugar bonds with protein and creates advanced glycation end products (aptly abbreviated AGEs), which cause collagen to become inflamed and stiff, leading to wrinkles.

Why Food Is Always Better Than a Pill

“There are so many factors in food that haven’t been studied. It’s very likely that these unknowns work synergistically for a bigger benefit than what you can find in a supplement.”
—Nicholas Perricone, dermatologist

According to dermatologist Leslie Baumann, red wine contains skin-friendly grape-seed extract and resveratrol, two powerful antioxidants. Hops in beer, it turns out, may also offer antioxidant benefits.

Five Eating Styles That Can Lead to Weight Gain

by The Editors of Prevention,

The last dish has been washed, and as you sit back and watch Modern Family, what’s in your hand? A pint of Haagen-Dazs or a cup of tea? On weekends, do you watch your calories as carefully as you did Monday through Friday, or do you take a healthy eating vacation and go to town?

Certain ingrained habits—even seemingly minor ones—have a significant effect on your weight. The hard part, too, is that even when you make the decision to, say, eat more fruit or hit the gym one more time a week, past behaviors can sneak in and undermine your best efforts. Those patterns can be grouped into five basic eating types. Chances are, you’ll identify with one or more. Once you recognize your type (or types), you’ll be able to develop strategies and solutions tailored specifically to your needs. 

 Type # 1: The Weekender   You live “by the book” all week, only to throw it out the window on Friday night. Or maybe you travel a lot for work or pleasure, and as soon as your surroundings change, so do your eating and daily calorie-counting habits. 

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Fix It: 
Go (mildly) wild on Wednesday. It’s hard to resist going nuts on Saturday and ordering the mac ’n’ cheese when you’ve been buttoned up for 5 days straight, so consider working one splurge night into your week. If you inject a little food-related fun into the weekdays, you’ll be less likely to “reward” yourself with major damage on the weekends. 
 

Type # 2: The Calorie Drinker One of the biggest diet mistakes is thinking that if it’s something you sip, the calories won’t stick. Unfortunately, liquid calories are stealth fatteners—they go down quickly, making it easy to drink more and rack up the calories—fast. 

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Fix It: 
Make smarter switches. Whether your weakness is sweet coffee drinks or soda, there’s a way to alter your particular poison so it doesn’t sabotage your progress. Skip the sweetener (and whipped cream) in coffee and drink seltzer instead of sugar-packed soda. You’ll save hundreds of calories and barely notice the change. 

 

Type # 3: The Snacker  These days we’re confronted with calories everywhere we go, from bagels in the conference room to king-size chocolate bars in the checkout aisle. In an environment with such an abundance of cheap, easy calories, temptation lurks around every corner and chips away at your willpower. 

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Fix It: 
Track every single bite. It’s always important to track your meals, but in this case, it’s extra important that you take note of everything that slips between your lips. Until now, you probably haven’t been “counting” all those free samples at the supermarket, but they can easily cost you 100 calories or more. Seeing how all those extra bites add up is motivation enough to make you say no to the free muffin sample.  
 

Type # 4: The Stress Eater  Do you find yourself looking for solace in a red velvet cupcake after a long, stressful day? Do you empty a bag of tortilla chips whenever your mother-in-law is in town? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then stress eating is a part of your life–and probably a major hindrance to your weight loss. 

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Fix It:  Name that theme.  Are there any common themes among your stress-related binges? Do they generally occur at work? Do they happen mostly in the evenings, when you’re dealing with family, bills, or housework? If you know that a certain situation or person tends to push you over the edge, prepare yourself for the stress that will inevitably come. Just being aware that a binge-inducing situation is on the horizon can help you brace for it and lower the chances that you’ll give in. 

 
 
Type # 5: The Follower  Do you wonder why you’re not losing weight when you seem to be doing everything right? You may be falling for healthy buzzwords on a package of high-calorie processed food. Even actual “healthy” foods–some of which offer many benefits–can be calorie bombs. 

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Fix It: 
Don’t buy into marketing gimmicks. Read every food nutrition label and decide for yourself whether or not something makes sense for your calorie budget. Also, stop personalizing your food choices. Try not to categorize them as “good” or “bad”–and definitely don’t apply that black-and-white thinking to your character. Eating an apple does not make you a “good” person any more than eating a cookie makes you a “bad” person! If you’re an ecoconscious eater, “good” and “bad” have other connotations for you. While your efforts to green our planet are applause-worthy, don’t forget that words like organic, sustainable, and grass-fed do not necessarily mean “low in calories.” Being good to the Earth doesn’t automatically mean you’re making good choices for your waistline. 
Finally, beware of healthy calories. If eating larger portions of lower-calorie foods is your thing, that’s fine, but some foods can throw you off your budget when you indulge with too much abandon. For example, almonds are often touted for their nutritional power–and they do pack lots of protein and a nice dose of vitamin E and monounsaturated fats. But if you eat just 1/2 cup of almonds (easy to do in one sitting), you’re taking in 400 calories.

www.healingpowerhour.com

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For Healthy Food Recipes that are low in carbs but big on taste click here.

5 simple mistakes that ruin diets

Weight Loss Frustration

by The_Stir

Think you’re fit? Are you the master of your diet destiny? Confident that you make mostly smart decisions about food?

A new poll from Consumer Reports says that close to 90 percent of Americans claim to eat a healthy diet, but most of us may be giving ourselves more credit than we deserve.

Of those surveyed, only 15 percent actually counted calories and only 58 percent ate the recommended five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Roughly 30 percent who say they “carefully limit sugar” actually slurp up a sugar-sweetened drink most days. And 10 percent who say they “strictly limit their fat” had bacon or another fatty meat for breakfast.

This is sad and pathetic news, people. It’s this very same delusional way of thinking that has our country pushing higher and higher obesity rates every year. Just as with alcoholism, drug addiction or any other chronic issue, admitting you have a problem is the first step to solving it! 

Here, five ways we’re tricking, gaming and cheating ourselves into believing we’re healthier than we really are …  

1. We tweak the numbers to suit our goal Even if a 3 ounce portion of chicken or 2 ounces of pasta is one serving, we figure just a little bit more won’t hurt. After all, another smidge here or there won’t really count, right? And calories consumed in the middle of the night don’t count either. Rrrright. This little game we play with ourselves is an extension of keeping track of what you’re eating “in your head.” Clearly, there is a method to the madness of tracking your calories in a food journal.

2. We cut carbs, but make up for it by eating more … bacon! If I could have a penny for every time this year I’ve already heard people say, “I’m giving up carbs!” It may have worked for Drew Carey, I guess, but giving something up does not make us any healthier. It just makes us feel deprived. Plus, we’ll often convince ourselves that we “deserve” a new evil when we’ve given up the original bad guy. If you’re not going to allow yourself that cookie, but you “make up for it” with say, CHEESE—sorry, you’re not doing yourself any favors. 

3. We drink “diet” sodas, eat “diet” pudding, “low-fat” granola bars, etc. None of these are real food. In fact, they’re Franken-food made with black box warning ingredients like the neurotoxin in diet soda phenylalanine or processed soy that may upset your body’s delicate hormonal balance. Anyone serious about losing weight should steer clear of a product labeled “DIET.” Just look at the first three letters of that word — says it all, I’m tellin’ you!

4. We pick “easy-to-go,” “natural” snacks over an apple. I know—fruit is just such a pain in the ass, right? We have to buy it at $2.49 a pound (well, if we want the organic ones that are supposedly free of nasty pesticides) and then eat it before it rots at the bottom of our fridges. And it’s so boring! Instead, we’ll just get some pre-packaged dried fruit snacks or applesauces or something. It’s gotta be the same, cuz it says “all natural,” right?… WRONG. Just. No. Stop. Please. 

5. Figuring we know it all, we remain blissfully ignorant. “I’ll just eat a little less and take the stairs instead of the elevator.” “The real evils are sugar and fat, like in doughnuts and pizza, but whole wheat bagels and pretzels are better choices.” Myths and fairy tales. Obviously, we’re not as informed as we like to think we are. (After all, watching a whole season of The Biggest Loser doesn’t make any of us a certified nutritionist or personal trainer.) The good news is you can always tap the knowledge of someone who is one of those things … via books, the all-mighty Internet, Twitter, whatever. It seems most of us could all stand to continually educate ourselves on better ways to keep our health on track.

Confession time — are you really as healthy as you think you are?