Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: candy

How to Detox Your Body After Halloween

www.healingpowerhour.com

Advertisements

How Not to Gain Weight This Halloween

By Alyssa Kolsky Hertzig,

Now that you’ve got your costume under control, take a moment to consider this Halloween factoid: Americans buy 600 million pounds of candy the week leading up to the big day. Want to avoid gaining 600 million pounds? Then, nibble on this:

Curb your candy buying. Sure, you need some for the trick-or-treaters, but do you really need ten jumbo-size bags? Buy only what you’re likely to dole out to the neighborhood kids, and go for something you hate—that way you’re less likely to pilfer from your stash. “If you’re a chocolate person, buy something like SweeTarts or gummies,” suggests Lauren Slayton, a registered dietician and founder of Foodtrainers.

Choose the lesser evils. When it comes to candy, there’s bad, and then there’s bad. “If you’re dying for chocolate, try 3 Musketeers or Tootsie Rolls, which are lower in calories than most,” says Slayton. Lollipops are another good choice. “Of my 15,000 patients, no one has even gained an ounce from them,” says Stephen Gullo, a weight-loss expert in New York City. “They take a long time to eat, and they’re harder to binge on.”

Get rid of temptation. The average Halloween bucket holds 250 pieces of candy and 9,000 calories—so don’t let it linger in your house for weeks. Slayton recommends keeping a snack-size Ziploc baggie’s worth of candy at most, and then getting rid of the rest. If you can’t bear to toss it, consider donating leftover candy to a local hospital or to an organization such as Operation Gratitude that will send it to the troops.

Stay strong at the office. Others are surely going to tote their leftover candy straight to work—avoid the office stash, especially around 3 and 4:30 PM. “That’s when blood sugar dips and resistance plummets,” says Gullo. Instead, arm yourself by bringing healthy snacks to work; nonfat Greek yogurt or Chocolite bars are great, filling options.


www.healingpowerhour.com

Beware of the Halloween Candy Calories!

We’re all guilty. We all dump out our kids’ candy bags when they get back from a night of trick-or-treating and dig through it to find the good stuff. But wait! You’ll be surprised as to how many calories are in one tiny Twix.

Candy is listed in order of best (least calories) to worst (put it down and step away).

Tootsie Roll

 1 piece (roll); Calories: 25, Total Fat: 0g, Carbs: 6g, Protein: 0g

Hershey’s Chocolate Kisses

 3 pieces; Calories: 75, Total Fat: 1.5g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: .3g

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup

1 piece (15g); Calories: 80, Total Fat: 4.5g, Carbs: 8g, Protein: 1g

Twix

 1 bar; Calories: 120, Total Fat: 6g, Carbs: 16g, Protein: 1g

Kit Kat

 3 two-piece bars; Calories: 210, Total Fat: 11g, Carbs: 28g, Protein: 3g

Reese’s Pieces

 1 package; Calories: 210, Total Fat: 10g, Carbs: 26g, Protein: 5g

Butterfinger

 1 bar; Calories: 270, Total Fat: 11g, Carbs: 44g, Protein: 3g

Snickers

 1 bar; Calories: 280, Total Fat: 14g, Carbs: 35g, Protein: 4g

Bubblegum

1 piece; Calories: 13, Total Fat: 0g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: 0g

Gummi Bears

 17 bears; Calories: 120, Total Fat: 0g, Carbs: 27g, Protein: 2g

Candy Corn

 21 pieces; Calories: 150, Total Fat: 0, Carbs: 37g, Protein: 0g

Junior Mints

 16 pieces; Calories: 170, Total Fat: 3g, Carbs: 35g, Protein: 1g

Hot Tamales

 1 Bag; Calories: 220, Total Fat: 0g, Carbs: 54g, Protein: 0g

Skittles

1 bag; Calories: 250, Total Fat: 2.5g, Carbs: 56g, Protein: 0 g

Read more: http://www.celestialhealing.net/healthintro..htm

The New “All Natural” Packaged Food

By Kristen M

Packaged, so-called “all-natural” foods. They’re coming at you — fast and strong. As this recent article in the Chicago Tribune points out, all the big players in processed food manufacturing are jumping on the bandwagon of “all-natural” and “healthy” foods:

The companies that introduced products such as Doritos, Miracle Whip, Butterfinger and the venti caramel Frappuccino now maintain that the future lies in the health and wellness category. A wave of products expected to hit grocery stores in the next year will raise the ante for shoppers’ attention and compete for their trust. What constitutes “healthy” will ultimately be decided by consumers at the cash register.

Apparently the big wigs are starting to notice that health-conscious consumers are chipping away at their market share. So, they’re making changes. They’re making processed foods “healthier” in the hopes of appealing to this growing segment of the population with the allure of products that “align with organic principles” without actually carrying the heavy price tag of organics.

While I’m glad that the average American is starting to demand healthier food options, I’m actually laughing at the food industry’s response (in a sad, “I-pity-you” sort of way):

In a recent interview, Nestle CEO Paul Bulcke expressed concern about the demonization of food in America.

“We are thinking increasingly in wrong dimensions where we see food as bad, and in French they have an expression, ‘le poison c’est la dose,’ and you would say, ‘the poison is the quantity,’” he said, simultaneously acknowledging that Nestle has “a role to play” in responsible eating.

And while the formula for profitable health food has yet to be discovered, Bulcke maintains that it can be done. Basically, he said, the process is about making “food pleasurable with more goodies and less baddies.” And if that can be accomplished, he said, healthy eating will also be a profitable business. (source)

Of course, as businessmen, it’s all about profit — about discovering the formula for profitable health food. It’s about figuring out a way for the packaged food industry to cash in on this growing trend towards more natural foods.

NEWSFLASH, Mr. Bulcke: IT’S NOT POSSIBLE. By definition, a packaged food that is cheap enough to be manufactured in bulk, durable enough to be shipped across the country or around the world, and stable enough to last for weeks, months, or even years on shelves IS NOT “NATURAL.”

Real Food decomposes. As Michael Pollan has pointed out on numerous occassions, there’s a reason why the Twinkie on his shelf is still as fluffy and soft today as it was more than 2 years ago when he first pulled it out of its packaging. It’s not food! If the bacteria and other microbial life on this planet won’t eat it, neither should we.

Mr. Bulcke says people like me “see food as bad.” Nope. People like me see FAKE FOOD as bad — the kind he manufactures and sells.

Ultimately the Chicago Tribune article points out that the definition of “healthy” is up for grabs. Is it reducing salt? Lowering fat? Reducing ingredients? Avoiding artificial-ingredients so we can slap an “all-natural” label on something?

And therein lies the flaw behind all packaged and processed food production — this belief that with a judicious application of food science, we can actually manufacture fake foods to make them healthier than the real thing.

While I’m ecstatic that the movement towards Real Food has gone mainstream enough to warrant an industry response like this, I’m also saddened that the big food manufacturers don’t really have any hope of getting the underlying message. We want Real Food! Not edible food-like substances created in laboratories instead of kitchens.

So, what will your response be to the billions of dollars worth of “all-natural” and “healthy” packaged foods being introduced by PepsiCo, Kraft, Starbucks, and Nestle be this coming year? Will you be thankful that you can finally get a “healthier” version of your favorite junk foods? Will you avoid the packaged foods like the plague?

Five Eating Styles That Can Lead to Weight Gain

by The Editors of Prevention,

The last dish has been washed, and as you sit back and watch Modern Family, what’s in your hand? A pint of Haagen-Dazs or a cup of tea? On weekends, do you watch your calories as carefully as you did Monday through Friday, or do you take a healthy eating vacation and go to town?

Certain ingrained habits—even seemingly minor ones—have a significant effect on your weight. The hard part, too, is that even when you make the decision to, say, eat more fruit or hit the gym one more time a week, past behaviors can sneak in and undermine your best efforts. Those patterns can be grouped into five basic eating types. Chances are, you’ll identify with one or more. Once you recognize your type (or types), you’ll be able to develop strategies and solutions tailored specifically to your needs. 

 Type # 1: The Weekender   You live “by the book” all week, only to throw it out the window on Friday night. Or maybe you travel a lot for work or pleasure, and as soon as your surroundings change, so do your eating and daily calorie-counting habits. 

.
Fix It: 
Go (mildly) wild on Wednesday. It’s hard to resist going nuts on Saturday and ordering the mac ’n’ cheese when you’ve been buttoned up for 5 days straight, so consider working one splurge night into your week. If you inject a little food-related fun into the weekdays, you’ll be less likely to “reward” yourself with major damage on the weekends. 
 

Type # 2: The Calorie Drinker One of the biggest diet mistakes is thinking that if it’s something you sip, the calories won’t stick. Unfortunately, liquid calories are stealth fatteners—they go down quickly, making it easy to drink more and rack up the calories—fast. 

.
Fix It: 
Make smarter switches. Whether your weakness is sweet coffee drinks or soda, there’s a way to alter your particular poison so it doesn’t sabotage your progress. Skip the sweetener (and whipped cream) in coffee and drink seltzer instead of sugar-packed soda. You’ll save hundreds of calories and barely notice the change. 

 

Type # 3: The Snacker  These days we’re confronted with calories everywhere we go, from bagels in the conference room to king-size chocolate bars in the checkout aisle. In an environment with such an abundance of cheap, easy calories, temptation lurks around every corner and chips away at your willpower. 

.
Fix It: 
Track every single bite. It’s always important to track your meals, but in this case, it’s extra important that you take note of everything that slips between your lips. Until now, you probably haven’t been “counting” all those free samples at the supermarket, but they can easily cost you 100 calories or more. Seeing how all those extra bites add up is motivation enough to make you say no to the free muffin sample.  
 

Type # 4: The Stress Eater  Do you find yourself looking for solace in a red velvet cupcake after a long, stressful day? Do you empty a bag of tortilla chips whenever your mother-in-law is in town? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then stress eating is a part of your life–and probably a major hindrance to your weight loss. 

.
Fix It:  Name that theme.  Are there any common themes among your stress-related binges? Do they generally occur at work? Do they happen mostly in the evenings, when you’re dealing with family, bills, or housework? If you know that a certain situation or person tends to push you over the edge, prepare yourself for the stress that will inevitably come. Just being aware that a binge-inducing situation is on the horizon can help you brace for it and lower the chances that you’ll give in. 

 
 
Type # 5: The Follower  Do you wonder why you’re not losing weight when you seem to be doing everything right? You may be falling for healthy buzzwords on a package of high-calorie processed food. Even actual “healthy” foods–some of which offer many benefits–can be calorie bombs. 

.
Fix It: 
Don’t buy into marketing gimmicks. Read every food nutrition label and decide for yourself whether or not something makes sense for your calorie budget. Also, stop personalizing your food choices. Try not to categorize them as “good” or “bad”–and definitely don’t apply that black-and-white thinking to your character. Eating an apple does not make you a “good” person any more than eating a cookie makes you a “bad” person! If you’re an ecoconscious eater, “good” and “bad” have other connotations for you. While your efforts to green our planet are applause-worthy, don’t forget that words like organic, sustainable, and grass-fed do not necessarily mean “low in calories.” Being good to the Earth doesn’t automatically mean you’re making good choices for your waistline. 
Finally, beware of healthy calories. If eating larger portions of lower-calorie foods is your thing, that’s fine, but some foods can throw you off your budget when you indulge with too much abandon. For example, almonds are often touted for their nutritional power–and they do pack lots of protein and a nice dose of vitamin E and monounsaturated fats. But if you eat just 1/2 cup of almonds (easy to do in one sitting), you’re taking in 400 calories.

www.healingpowerhour.com

.

.

For Healthy Food Recipes that are low in carbs but big on taste click here.