Dr Akilah – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah

Tag Archives: bodybuilding

Dr. Akilah Schäfer interview with Via La Vegan!

Dr. Akilah ElDr Akilah Schäfer is a Professional Natural Bodybuilder and owner of Celestial Healing Wellness Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA and Munich, Germany. She is a Naturopathic Doctor, Master Herbalist and Certified Personal Trainer spreading the message of holistic health and veganism all over the world. She teaches holistic health, fitness and vegan-based nutritional classes online through her website as well as in person.

Why Vegan?

How and why did you decide to become a vegan?

Click Here To Read the Entire Interview and More

Check out vivalavegan.net website

Viva La Vegan

https://plus.google.com/104196590098279587958/

Advertisements

10-year-old Fitness Guru Known as The “Workout Kid” Turns Heads

Yesterday I did an article about an elder taking the fitness world by storm. Now it’s time to show you the youngest. Meet C J Senter

C.J. Senter may or may not be the next Tony Horton or the next Barry Sanders, but he is definitely the next 10-year-old to watch.

Granted, when most people hear “child prodigy,” they rightfully raise an eyebrow and wonder who is pulling the strings. Add a workout DVD by a fourth-grader with sculpted muscles to the mix and “cute” can turn to “concerning.” But it turns out the story behind “C.J. The Workout Kid” is a lot more inspiring than insidious.

C.J. started working out five years ago when his football coach told him and his teammates to go home over a weekend and get some exercise. He did some push-ups and sit-ups and loved it. Not too long after, he saw a P90X infomercial and loved that too. He’s been working out ever since. C.J. does his own routines three times a week, after school and homework, and he’s given new names to some old and boring moves, like the burpee, which involves a squat, push-up, and jump. C.J. calls that one the “shredder.” He even teaches a class of (mostly older) kids at the gym near where he lives in Locust Grove, Ga.

“It feels great,” C.J. says by phone from his Georgia home. “I love staying fit and healthy.”

But wait a minute. Research shows kids shouldn’t be touching weights until at least age 15.

“I don’t use weights,” C.J. says.

Not even bench press?

“I don’t bench press,” he says. “It’s not good for kids.”

Surely he’s on some insane diet, right? His dad feeds him wheat grass and cow brain, perhaps?

“I’m not on a diet,” C.J. says. “I eat everything.”

Disbelieving? So is Carlos Senter — C.J.’s dad. Carlos has spent most of his son’s life in shock, ever since C.J. somehow climbed out of his crib — at seven months old.

“It was two, three o’clock in the morning,” Carlos says, “and boom! My wife would go look in his room and here he comes, crawling out. He would go into the refrigerator, too.”

Carlos can’t quite figure out how his son got to be so fit. He says his relatives put on muscle easily, but not this easily. C.J. has an older brother and a younger sister who don’t really love sports as much. And Dad isn’t exactly chiseled like Terrell Owens. In fact, he admits C.J.’s work ethic has shamed him and his wife into getting into better shape.

“He doesn’t really eat candy,” Carlos says. “I have no idea why.”

And for that matter, Carlos has no idea why his son doesn’t have an attitude. “This kid will score a touchdown, take the football to the ref and act like nothing ever happened,” Carlos says. “If it was me, well, I probably would be a little different.”

But as much as the “Workout Kid” routine is working — C.J.’s DVDs are in so much demand that his dad hired a PR rep — Carlos says he gives most of the DVDs away for free and the primary objective is to help kids get off the couch.

C.J.’s primary objective has always been the same thing: make it to the NFL. He’s a running back and safety, modeling his game after another C.J. — Titans speed demon Chris Johnson.

C.J.’s already been named MVP for the state of Georgia as an 8-and-under, and last year he played in the 10-and-under group as a 9-year-old. Carlos says that the team run by former NFL running back Jamal Lewis expressed interest in having C.J. commute to Atlanta to join up, but the drive was simply too far.

High school coaches are already aware of C.J., but Carlos, who runs a local barber shop, insists on not looking too far ahead.

“As long as he’s happy,” Carlos says, “I’m happy.”

C.J. does seem happy, even though he’s a little bit tired of when kids come up to him at school and ask, “Are those your real muscles?”

The next generation of Atlanta prep football players is about to find out.

.

www.HealingPowerHour.com 

Meet The World’s Oldest Female Bodybuilder……. Ernestine Shepherd

She may be a grandmother, but don’t call her old.

Ernestine Shepherd has impeccably toned ‘six-pack’ abs that are the marvel of her Baltimore fitness centre.

Her husband of 54 years, Collin Shepherd, says he ‘has trouble keeping guys away from her’.

The Shepherds live in Baltimore with their son, 53, and grandson, 14.

Ms Shepherd does some modelling and teaches fitness classes, and told the Washington Post, ‘If you are going to try to motivate people, you have to live that part’.

She also trains rigorously with Yohnnie Shambourger, 57, a former Mr Universe who won the gold medal in bodybuilding at the Pan American Games in 1995.

Seventy-four-year-old Ms Shepherd is the world’s oldest competitive bodybuilder and according to her, “Age ain’t nothing but a number.” You got that right, sister.

She doesn’t live in the fountain of youth, she lives in Baltimore. She didn’t get this body by taking an extreme knitting class either. She teaches a body sculpting class. And, no, she isn’t eating or drinking any concoction from late night infomercials that promise to shed weight and do your taxes at the same time. She maintains a strict diet of bland chicken, green beans, plain brown rice and egg whites.

Crazy thing is, Shepherd didn’t even start competing until she turned 57, inspired by a less than flattering experience involving a swimsuit and a dressing room. At that point, she and her older sister, Mildred, made a “pinkie swear” to take better care of their bodies. While her sister has since passed, Shepherd has gone on to complete nine marathons, win two bodybuilding contests and see herself listed in the 2010 and 2011 Guinness World Records as the oldest competitive female bodybuilder in the world.

Ernestine Shepherd turned 75 on June 16, 2011 and she is still going strong. 

.

www.healingpowerhour.com

10 Reasons Why Women Should Lift Weights

10 Reasons Why Lifting Weights Is Good For Women

Everyone has seen the adverts showing men lifting weights and looking great, but who knew weightlifting was equally beneficial to women? Researchers have recently found compelling reasons for women to start lifting weights too, but the number of women following this advice is still very small. Here are the top ten reasons you should hit the weights…

1. It’ll make you strong!

Including weights in your exercise program will help strengthen the muscles. Recent studies have shown that even moderate weight training can increase a women’s overall strength by 50%. Wouldn’t you love to show your boyfriend/husband that you are not just a fragile girl. And imagine all the extra shopping bags you can carry!

2. It’ll tone you up!

A woman who weight trains three a week for two months will lose thirty pounds of fat, and gain four pounds of muscle. This means you’ll appear much slimmer, and weigh less too! And who doesn’t like a super toned body like all the hot celebrities out there.

Only Steroids and HGH will make women bulk up this

Unlike men, women will not appear “bigger” because of more muscle unless they are taking anabolic steroids or human growth hormone drugs. That is of course if you lift appropriate weights and don’t overdo it like female body builders who have their own reasons for doing so. When done right, your body will get toned and you will look slimmer much like a sports woman from the Olympics!

4. It makes your bones STRONGER!

Weight training increases the vitality of the bones, and prevents osteoporosis, a horrible and sometimes crippling illness. Bone density improves around 20% in six months of weight training, but improves fastest when teamed with a high calcium diet.

5. You’ll be healthier!

Not only will your bones be strong, your muscles and connective tissues will improve too, meaning you are much less likely to pull or strain muscles, or to suffer from arthritis which even though quite a common foot problem can be avoided. A 12 year study conducted recently showed that strengthening the muscles in the lower back reduced back pain by 80%!

6. You protect your heart!

Weight training is proven to lower bad cholesterol, and blood pressure. These are both key signs of unhealthiness, which can really affect your heart, so keeping them as low as possible is important. If you weight train and do a form of cardiovascular exercise, the benefits are maximised.

Oldest Female Bodybuilder in The World

Ernestine Shepherd World”s Oldest Bodybuilder at 75 years old!

7. It’s never too late!

Even women in their 80’s and 90’s can benefit from learning to weight train, as long as it is done in a safe environment. The benefits can be enjoyed at any age and your resultant healthy heart will thank you!

8. You’re less likely to suffer from diabetes!

Weight training appears to improve the body’s ability to process sugar, which reduces the chances of diabetes. Of course there are cures for diabetes. But prevention is better than cure right? Training can improve glucose usage by 23% in the first two months! As diabetes is a growing problem, this is a huge benefit.

9. You will improve your outlook!

Ten weeks of weight training has been proven to increase confidence and fight depression, due to feeling capable and the feel good hormones being released. What a perfect way to keep your mind and body healthy!

10. You’ll increase your performance!

Training will make everyday activities much easier, so whether you can cycle that bit further or run that bit faster, you’ll see the difference in your everyday life, too. It can even help with hobbies such as golf! And let me not even begin to state the great effects it will have on your sex life!

Staying fit can be hard work, and with so many suggestions, you feel like it’s much easier to just stick to the treadmill. The benefits of weight training are unbeatable though, so get down to a gym and see what your personal trainer recommends. I did, and now I love it! Plus, you never know who you’ll meet… Have you started lifting weights, and felt the benefits? Please share your stories!

.

.

Akilah M. El, N.D. is a Naturopathic Doctor and board-certified Master Herbalist with a private practice in Atlanta Georgia and Berlin Germany. Join Dr Akilah El on Facebook and Twitter

For More Health Tips Like This Check Out Our Health Tips Page

Top 10 Fitness Time-Wasters

Wasting Time In the Gym

By Barbara Russi Sarnataro

Avoid these time thieves and make the most of your trip to the gym.

We’ve all done it. We give ourselves an hour to get in a workout, then end up wasting nearly half of it — running an errand or two, getting dressed at the gym, chatting with acquaintances we bump into along the way. Even with the best intentions, you can sidetrack your progress if you don’t make good use of your time. Think you might be frittering away precious fitness time? Check out what three fitness experts identified as the top 10 fitness time-wasters, and see where you can improve.

1. Spinning Your Wheels.

When it comes to strength training, doing too many repetitions with lighter weights equals wasting time. “When we’re trying to build strength and build muscles, we want to attack as many muscle fibers as possible,” explains sports conditioning coach Fiona Lockhart. That means upping the weight and decreasing the reps: “Fifty biceps curls might build muscular endurance but you’re not going to build the strength you’re looking for,” Lockhart says. Of course, it also takes a lot more time to do 50 reps with light weights than 10 to 15 reps with more weight.

A good rule of thumb: If you’re able to do more than 15 repetitions of an exercise, it’s time to increase the weight, Lockhart says. The same is true of cardiovascular exercise. It’s easy to hop on the treadmill and type in the same speed, incline, and time every single time. But your body gets used to it. “If you’re trying to maximize time at the gym, work at a higher intensity for a shorter time,” says Teri Trese, MS, a fitness trainer at Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa. “If you can get and stay near 85% of your target heart rate, you’ll accomplish more for your total fitness.”

2. Failing to Plan.

If you haven’t been this person, you’ve seen her — wandering from machine to machine with the 100-yard stare of someone whose mind is elsewhere.

It happens all the time, says Lockhart. You get to the weight room and float around until you find an open machine. Then your time is over, and you’ve only gotten through three or four exercises. “Think about what you’re going to do in advance, then stick with it,” says Lockhart. “If it’s cardio, then get on the treadmill or bike and focus. Throw in some two-minute intervals.” For weight training, if you’re not working with a trainer, become your own. “Write a list of six or eight exercises (for different muscle groups) that you are going to accomplish in the given time,” Lockhart says. “When you have tasks, you get a better workout.”

Have an alternate exercise machine in mind in case the one you want is being used, suggests Debi Pillarella, MEd, exercise program manager for the Community Hospital Fitness Pointe in Munster, Ind. “You keep your metabolism stoked by keeping your body moving,” Pillarella says. “You shouldn’t rest for more than 90 seconds or your body will go back to the pre-exercise state and you increase the risk of injury.”

Using Bad Form Lifting Weights3. Using Bad Form.

Don’t just do the exercise; do it right, says Fabio Comana, MA, MS, certification and exam development manager for the American Council on Exercise.
Improper exercise technique not only poses a greater risk of injury to muscles and joints, it also wastes your time.

You may be thinking you’re strengthening one muscle when in fact you are straining another or stressing a joint. For example, doing bicep curls with your knees hyper-extended and your back muscles shortened could do more harm to your knees and back than good to your arms.

Fitness trainers or floor assistants are on hand at most gyms to assist you with proper form. Use them. Ask for someone to walk you through the equipment, showing you proper technique with machines and free weights.

4. Being Too Social.

“Social support is great,” says Trese. “Knowing that a familiar face will be there at the same time” can keep you going with your exercise regimen. “But you don’t want to make it just a social hour.” When walking on treadmills with a companion, Lockhart suggests agreeing to chat during the warm-up and cool-down, but to stay quiet and commit to pushing yourself for the time in between.

“Work at an intensity that burns significant calories and is too high to carry on a full-blown conversation,” Lockhart suggests. When you work out with a friend or friends, set some rules first to be sure everyone stays on track with time, Trese advises. Try doing 8 to 10 exercises in 30 minutes, and resting no longer than a minute between exercises.

5. Getting Stuck in a Rut.

Muscles have memory, says Pillarella. They adapt, they adjust — and our bodies plateau. “If you always use the same piece of equipment, your body will become adept at that type of exercise,” she says. Instead, mix it up. “If you always use the treadmill, get on the bike,” Lockhart suggests. “If you always work at the same pace, practice doing intervals — shorter surges to build your upper-end capacity. It’ll jog the body’s systems — make your body wake up and have to regroup.”

To add intervals, increase incline or speed for short periods during cardio exercise, says Trese. With your strength routine, change the order of the exercises or rotate from machines to free weights. “With more versatility, your muscles won’t be prepared and your body will not automatically know how to respond,” Trese says. This will keep things fresh for your mind, too, she says, “making workout routines less boring.” Lockhart advises varying your exercise program every six to eight weeks if you’re working out consistently. This is enough time for the body to benefit from the routine without getting complacent.

6. Watching TV or Reading.

“People tend to get on cardio equipment and think they’re paying the piper,Wasting Time in Fitness but they’re so into their book they’re wasting precious caloric time,” says Pillarella. The bottom line is that when you’re focused on other things, your workout suffers, she says. You can walk at a 4 mph pace for 45 minutes and burn 300 to 400 calories, says Pillarella. But you could get the same calorie burn in 20 to 25 minutes doing intervals (running or walking as fast as you can for a minute or two) every 90 seconds.

“It’s the total number of calories burned that counts,” she says. If you need a diversion to make it through your session on the elliptical machine, try music, suggests Comana. Invigorate your workout with a fresh mix on your iPod instead of spending your time staring at the crawl on Fox News. “Music can inspire you to pick up the tempo,” Comana says.

7. Resting Too Long.

The machine you want to use is occupied, so you grab a towel, get a drink of water, run to the bathroom — and the next thing you know, 10 minutes have passed. To avoid such time-wasting, rest only 30 to 90 seconds between strength exercises, says Comana.

To maximize time, alternate a set of exercises for your biceps with a set for triceps, he says. That allows you to shorten the rest interval in between — while one muscle group is working, the opposing group is getting active recovery.

You can also save time during your warm-up by mimicking exercises you’ll be doing in the workout. For example, Comana says, if you plan to work your legs by doing lunges and squats with weights, warm up with high knee steps, butt kicks, lunges with a twist, and sumo squats. “Perform movements that are the same as you’ll do in the exercise so that you can better prepare the body for the exercise,” advises Comana. “You’re warming up the joints while tying into the neuromuscular system to create movement preparation.”

8. Isolating Muscle Groups.

How can you fit in separate exercises for your biceps, triceps, deltoids and lats when you only have 30 minutes to work out? For body-builders, concentrating on two or three muscle groups per session might be fine, but this doesn’t work for the average person. There’s not enough time to get to all the muscle groups in three 30-minute sessions a week.

Instead, says Pillarella, choose exercises like squats and push-ups that target several muscle groups at once. You’ll get a better workout in less time and you’ll also be training more functionally (mimicking the way you use your body in daily life).

9. Changing Clothes at the Gym.

Dressing at the gym can be a big time-waster. Change before leaving work or the house and you’re less likely to change your mind about working out once you hop into the car, Trese suggests.

You’re also less likely to get into a conversation in the locker room that could shave 10 minutes off your workout. “Some people even go to the extreme where they wear their workout clothes to bed so they can just get up and go,” says Trese. If you don’t like the idea of sleeping in shorts and T-shirt, try laying out your workout clothes the night before to save time in the morning.

10. Waiting until Afternoon to Work Out.

With determination, it’s possible for late risers to fit in regular afternoon fitness sessions. But there’s no question that people who work out in the mornings are more likely to stick to their routines, Trese says. There’s less time to make excuses, and fewer things to get in the way of a workout.

If you promise yourself a 4:30 p.m. walk, it’s much more likely something will come up, Trese says. Before you know it, it’s 5:30, and you’ve missed your window.

Waiting until late in the day, “is setting you up for a downward spiral,” she says.

.

.

Personal Fitness Training With Dr Akilah