Dr Akilah El – Celestial Healing Wellness Center

The Natural Health and Holistic World According to Dr Akilah El

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The Ten Worst Foods To Eat

Quite simply, you really are what you eat, but the standard American diet leaves plenty of nutrients lacking … and gives you an excess of unhealthy fats, sodium, preservatives and chemical additives.

Every day, 7 percent of the U.S. population visits a McDonald’s, and 20-25 percent eat fast food of some kind, says Steven Gortmaker, professor of society, human development, and health at the Harvard School of Public Health in Harvard Magazine. As for children, 30 percent between the ages of 4 and 19 eat fast food on any given day.

When Morgan Spurlock, the mastermind behind the film Super Size Me, ate only McDonald’s for 30 days straight, his body fell apart and he gained 25 pounds!

“My body just basically falls apart over the course of this diet,” Spurlock told Newsweek. “I start to get tired, I start to get headaches; my liver basically starts to fill up with fat because there’s so much fat and sugar in this food. My blood sugar skyrockets, my cholesterol goes up off the charts, my blood pressure becomes completely unmanageable. The doctors were like, ‘You have to stop.’”

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Americans get processed food not only from fast-food restaurants but also from their neighborhood grocery stores. As it stands, about 90 percent of the money that Americans spend on food is used to buy — that’s right — processed foods.

So you have a choice to make when you eat. You can eat foods that will nourish your body, give you energy, and keep you healthy, or you can choose those that may lead to chronic disease, fatigue and weight gain.

Eating healthy will become obvious if you truly listen to your body. One hour after eating how do you feel? Time it and ask yourself. Do you feel better with more energy or worse one hour after eating or drinking something? If worse, then stop ingesting what makes you feel bad instead of what will make you feel better or even great!

Life’s too short to not feel the best you can and help your body be the healthiest and strongest it can be.

Here we’ve detailed the 10 worst food choices in American’s diets so that this can help you make the best food choices for your health.

  1. Pork Scratchings Heavy and hard, we are talking fatty pig skin deep fried and then doused in salt. Also, if you are lucky you might even get one sporting a few hairs; pig hair is usually removed by quickly burning the skin before it is cut into pieces and cooked in the hot fat. Plus they are not great for your teeth either; we couldn’t get the stats on how many dental injuries have been inflicted by eating these suckers but we are guessing it’s pretty high.
  2. Fried Desserts Fried desserts feature high up on the list of worst foods to eat as essentially you are dipping something in batter that is already high in sugar and fat, and then deep frying it. And don’t be fooled by pineapple and banana fritters either, they are no better because they are fruit, the layer of batter and the fact they are swimming in sugary syrup make them no go dishes too.
  3. Cheesy Nacho Chips, Chips or fries could feature as a bad food on their own, but, as you know we are all about moderation here at and seriously cutting chips from your life totally would be a hard move.  But taking a plate of chips and layering them in cheese, well, that takes them up a notch in the bad food stakes. Cheese typically contains over 10 times as much saturated fat as fish and white meat and coupled with deep fried carbs, a serving of cheesy chips are a big bad no no.
  4. Pop and Soda Drinks – yeah they’re bad, mainly because they pack massive amounts of calories even in  small quantities, so you are adding to your daily calorie quota and getting little nutritional value in return.  Studies have also linked fizzy drink consumption to osteoporosis, tooth decay and heart disease. And diet drinks are not recommended either, granted they are lower in calories but as they contribute to dental erosion (the bubbles in the drink are acidic) they are a no go as well.
  5. Hydrogenated fats – These are mostly man-made fats that are used in bakery items and stick margarine. Studies show that it isn’t so much how much fat there is in your diet that causes problems, as what kind of fat, and hydrogenated fats are the worst. Avoid buying cookies, crackers, baked goods or anything else that has hydrogenated oil on the ingredient list. Fortunately, the FDA now requires that food manufactures identify the amount of hydrogenated fats in their products—look for trans fats on the nutrition panel.
  6. Liquid Meals Okay, they aren’t inherently bad for you, but liquid meals or meal-replacement drinks do keep you from eating proper food. You need to make sure you eat eating whole, natural foods to ensure you gain all your nutrients. Meal replacements maybe okay for people who are too ill to eat, but don’t let them replace the real foods in your diet.
     
  7.  Processed Meats These are also sometimes referred to as ‘mystery meats’ because it’s ambiguous as to what some of them actually contain. But you can be assured that if it comes from a can and is kind of unrecognisable – it’s not going to be great for your body. Try to steer clear of sausages and salamis too, these food stuffs are generally all the unwanted bits churned up with fat and salt, we are talking heads, knees and toes (plus a few other less-desirable bits).
  8. Chicken Nuggets First off, chicken nuggets that are not made from fillets are the real bad guys. Again it’s similar to the sausages situation, all the leftover carcass bits mixed up with sawdust-type stuff to bulk out the meat so manufacturers can crank out more portions.  But it’s when these little nuggets are deep fried that really boosts their ‘worst-food’ status and it’s all to do with the size. Smaller fried items, i.e. nuggets absorb more fat that larger pieces of fried goods, so a portion of nuggets will pack way more fat that a single larger fried piece. So if you want fried chicken – go for a big breast.
  9. Doughnuts If there is one food that epitomises the 21st century junk food it’s the doughnut. Coated, filled, glazed, sugared, jam crammed or plain old ring they are not great for your body.  And it’s not only the refined flour, refined sugar and then the frying in the refined oil that makes them bad for you. Doughnuts will upset blood-sugar balance, and give a quick high followed by a crash and burn low, then you guessed it,  you’re hungry again and reaching for another one – that’s why they generally come in bags of 10.
  10. Canned Soups Now, soups don’t seem to be one of the bad boys and in comparison to some of the above, and they probably can sit quite comfy in the middle of the bad-food scale, but it’s their salt-packing stealth that gets them into this list. Soups mainly sport a healthy identity; wholesome, warming and good for you. The reality is many canned varieties are super-high in salt, so if you must have soup, avoid the canned ones or make your own.  

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For more healthy food ideas, recipes and information please visit our Health Tips Pagehttp://www.celestialhealing.net/healthintro..htm

Good Food Sources of Vitamins

By Jane Thurnell-Read

Some people are reluctant to take nutritional supplements and, even those who aren’t, need to get as many of their nutrients as they can from food. So here is a list of good dietary food sources of the different vitamins, but do remember that food storage and other factors will affect how much of a nutrient is in any particular food that you eat.

Vitamin A/ Retinol
Eggs, milk & dairy products, fish liver oil, carrots, parsley, spinach, broccoli.

Vitamin B1/ Thiamin
Wheat germ, yeast, liver, whole grains, brazil nuts, peanuts, soya flour, oatmeal, lentils, fish, poultry, beans, pork.

Vitamin B2 / Riboflavin
Fortified breakfast cereals, meat, eggs, almonds, blue cheese, mushrooms, green leafy vegetables, offal, nuts.

Vitamin B3 / Niacin/ Nicotinic Acid / Nicotinamide
Poultry, fish, peanuts, almonds, potatoes, yeast extract, hard cheese, haricot beans.

Vitamin B5 / Pantothenic Acid
Meat, whole grains, legumes, yeast.

Vitamin B6 / Pyridoxine
Fish, poultry, lean meat, whole grain cereals, walnuts, butterbeans, bananas, peanuts.

Vitamin B12 / Cyanoco-Balamin / Cobalamin
Eggs, oily fish, cheese, alfalfa sprouts.

Biotin (Classified as both Vitamin H/ and B Vitamin)
Yeast, eggs, milk, cheese, soya beans, peanuts, walnuts, beans, cauliflower.

Choline
Widely available in food.

Inositol
Widely available.

Folic Acid / Folate / Folacin
Green leafy vegetables, broccoli, spinach, asparagus, melons, pumpkins, peanuts, butter beans, carrots, egg yolk, apricots, avocado, tomatoes.

Vitamin C / Ascorbic Acid
Citrus fruit, nectarines, strawberries, melons, vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes. Most other fruits and vegetables contain some vitamin C.

Vitamin D / Calciferol
Oily fish, oysters, egg yolks, blue cheese, cream.

Vitamin E / Tocopherols
Vegetable oils, margarine, green vegetables, wheat germ, eggs, corn, nuts, seeds, olives.

Vitamin K
Green leafy vegetables, fruits, cereals, meat, soybeans.

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For more healthy food ideas, recipes and information please visit our Health Tips Pagehttp://www.celestialhealing.net/healthintro..htm

What Kind of Eater Are You?

by Alice Greene

There are so many different reasons why we struggle with food, and it isn’t black or white. Many of the reasons stem from what we’ve been told, the way we’ve been raised and the way we feel on a given day. It is liberating to know that the struggle isn’t just because we are bad when it comes to eating well.

In the book on Intuitive Eating, written by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, they recognized that there are many types of eaters, and most of us are dealing with a combination of these types. I have found this to be true in my own work, and I’ll start with the most common ones that I see with people. They are the chaotic eater, unconscious eater and emotional eater.

A chaotic eater

has no routine to their eating and has a tendency to skip meals, over schedule themselves and eat on the run. They really have no idea what they have just eaten or how much they’ve eaten. They just eat what is available and deal with food the next time it is available. They are completely out of touch with their eating habits and choices. Is this you? How can you be less chaotic this week?

An unconscious eater

is similar to a chaotic eater. They are not tuned into what or how much they are eating, because they eat while doing other things – like working, reading, talking, driving, watching TV or cooking. They will eat whatever is available and have no idea when they are hungry or if they have exceeded their fullness level. Are you conscious of your hunger or fullness levels? Try paying attention to them this week.

An emotional eater

uses food to cope with their feelings and they may not even realize they are doing this. What they do know is that they eat too much, often eating an entire package of something before they realize it. They are numb when they eat and feel powerless around food. Emotional eaters use food to avoid facing their feelings – even though they do not seem to feel anything. When was the last time you think you did this? Watch for emotional eating and see what you are feeling. The next two types are often linked to how we were raised. These are the waste-not and refuse-not eaters.

The waste-not eater

is someone who hates to see food go to waste and believes that it’s a deal to get lots of food for their money. They will overeat when food is in abundance because they hate to see it wasted. What they don’t realize is that by overeating it IS being wasted – literally. And it is going to cost them more money than they think they saved when their health is affected by overeating, such as diabetes, high cholesterol and blood pressure and coronary artery disease. How often do you eat things for fear they will go to waste? The next time you feel this urge, consider the real cost.

The refuse-not eater

is a person that can’t refuse food. They can’t say no when someone invites them to have food or encourages them to have more food than they need or want. They feel they have to eat for fear of disappointing or hurting the other person. As a result, they give that person power over how much food they eat. Did you eat something you didn’t want over the holidays because you felt you needed to make someone else feel good? It is ok to say I’ve had enough, no thanks, or thank you but I’m full.

Then there are the restrictive eaters.

These are people that are always going on the next diet or that follow a restricted eating plan with vigilance. The chronic dieter is constantly trying the latest diet, striving to lose a specific amount of weight, and creating new good and bad food lists they try to adhere to, but in the end they vacillate between under eating, over eating and bingeing. The careful eater scrutinizes labels and foods, weighs and measures all their food, writes every morsel down and tracks every gram against their narrow and very specific daily goals. For them there is little pleasure in eating. This was me for many years. Are you restrictive and struggling to enjoy your food? To gain a healthy view of food you may want to try intuitive eating.

An intuitive eater

is conscious of their body’s hunger signals. They eat to feel satisfied. They don’t fear overeating – instead they trust themselves to eat exactly what they need and have no guilt about eating foods they enjoy. This type of eater is conscious of their food choices and tends to want foods that honor their health and are balanced to meet their physical requirements. How does this sound to you? People who try it say it is a way to achieve freedom with food while achieving healthy eating habits.

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To read more about healthy eating methods please visit Our Websitewww.HealingPowerHour.com

10 Ways to Raise Food-Smart Kids

Want your children to eat healthy foods? Create a nutritional home. Begin here.
By Jennifer Warner

Creating a nutritional home is one of the most important steps you can take to ensure the health of your child. To start, make smart food choices, and help your child develop a positive relationship with healthy food. Your children will learn their food smarts from your example.

Here are the top 10 tips for getting children to eat healthy food, offered by Melinda Sothern, PhD, co-author of Trim Kids and director of the childhood obesity prevention laboratory at Louisiana State University:

1. Do not restrict food. Restricting food increases the risk your child may develop eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia later in life. It can also have a negative effect on growth and development.

2. Keep healthy food at hand. Children will eat what’s readily available. Keep fruit in a bowl on the counter, not buried in the crisper section of your fridge. And have an apple for your own snack. “Your actions scream louder than anything you will ever tell them,” says Sothern. Remember, your child can only choose foods that you stock in the house.

3. Don’t label foods as “good” or “bad.” Instead, tie foods to the things your child cares about, such as sports or appearance. Let your child know that lean protein such as turkey and calcium in dairy products give strength to their sports performance. The antioxidants in fruits and vegetables add luster to skin and hair.

4. Praise healthy choices. Give your children a proud smile and tell them how smart they are when they choose healthy foods.

5. Don’t nag about unhealthy choices. When children choose unhealthy food, ignore it. Or if your child always wants fatty, fried food, redirect the choice. You might try roasting potato sticks in the oven (tossed in just a bit of oil) instead of buying french fries. Or, if your child wants candy, you might make fresh strawberries dipped in a little chocolate sauce. Too busy? Then keep naturally sweet dried fruit at home for quick snacks.

6. Never use food as a reward. This could create weight problems in later life. Instead, reward your children with something physical and fun — perhaps a trip to the park or a quick game of catch.

7. Sit down to family dinners at night. If this isn’t a tradition in your home, it should be. Research shows that children who eat dinners at the table with their parents have better nutrition and are less likely to get in serious trouble as teenagers. Start with one night a week, and then work up to three or four, to gradually build the habit.

8. Prepare plates in the kitchen. There you can put healthy portions of each item on everyone’s dinner plate. Your children will learn to recognize correct portion sizes. And you may find your slacks fit better as well!

9. Give the kids some control. Ask your children to take three bites of all the foods on their plate and give it a grade, such as A, B, C, D, or F. When healthy foods – especially certain vegetables — get high marks, serve them more often. Offer the items your children don’t like less frequently. This lets your children participate in decision making. After all, dining is a family affair.

10. Consult your health care provider. Always talk with your child’s doctor or nutritionist before putting your child on a diet, trying to help your child gain weight, or making any significant changes in the type of foods your child eats. Never diagnose your child as too heavy, or too thin, by yourself.

“It’s all about gradual changes, it’s not overnight, and it’s an uphill battle for parents,” says Sothern “Everything outside of the home is trying to make kids overweight. The minute they walk out of the home, there are people trying to make them eat too much and serving them too much.”

But the food smarts your children will learn from you can protect them for a lifetime.

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www.healingpowerhour.com


Health Tip of the Week

Healthy Dine-out Tips

Before you go

  • Know what your restaurant options are – around your office and around your home. This way, you can decide which restaurants offer healthy choices.
  • If you are busy and eat out often, avoid considering dining out a special occasion. When we think of dining out as a special occasion or celebration, we tend to overeat and indulge in foods that we may not otherwise eat.
  • Budget your calories throughout the day: if you know that you are going out to eat for dinner, try to reduce your intake at breakfast and lunch so you can “save” some of your calories for when you dine out.
  • However, you may want to have a small snack (such as a fruit with cheese or a small handful of nuts) to help curb your appetite before dining out to help you avoid eating too much at your meal.
  • If you know where you will dine out, look up the menu (and nutrition information, if available) online and decide what you will eat before you get to the restaurant. This way you are in control to choose a lower calorie, lower fat meal option and are not overwhelmed by the menu options and careless about eating healthy when you arrive at the restaurant hungry.

What to Choose?

  • Avoid fried and battered foods such as calamari, tempura, chicken, chicken strips and certain Chinese dishes. Instead, ask for special requests for your meal: most restaurants are accommodating and will prepare your meal as you like: ask for grilled, broiled, roasted or steamed meats and vegetables. Asking for a side of steamed vegetables, salad or a baked potato instead of french fries can help cut calories and fat while increasing your intake of healthy nutrients!
  • When ordering salad, order your dressing on the side to limit your fat and calorie intake. However, be careful not to pour all of the dressing provided over your salad, it is often more than what you would normally get on a salad with the dressing. Depending on how hungry you are, a salad may be enough to satisfy your appetite (but make sure it includes some lean meat or fish for protein)!
  • When considering soup, go for the healthier, low fat options of broth based soups loaded with vegetables, beans (such as kidney, black, pinto or garbanzo), and whole grains (such as barley).

At the Restaurant

  • Split your meal with a friend or family member. Most restaurants serve portions that are two to three times what we need! Otherwise, have the serving staff put half of the meal in a to-go box before it is brought to the table.
  • Avoid all the extras, as these calories add up quickly: bread and butter on the table, sweetened drinks, appetizers, side items and desserts. Instead focus on a healthy balance of lean proteins, low fat carbohydrates and fruits and vegetables.

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www.healingpowerhour.com

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